Computer Science Courses Online

Live Instructor Led Online Training Computer Science courses is delivered using an interactive remote desktop! .

During the course each participant will be able to perform Computer Science exercises on their remote desktop provided by Qwikcourse.


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Select among the courses listed in the category that really interests you.

If you are interested in learning the course under this category, click the "Book" button and purchase the course. Select your preferred schedule at least 5 days ahead. You will receive an email confirmation and we will communicate with trainer of your selected course.

Computer Science Training


Algorithms

About

This course aims to be an accessible introduction to the design and analysis of efficient algorithms. Throughout the course we will introduce only the most basic techniques and describe the rigorous mathematical methods needed to analyze them. The topics covered include: The goal of the course is to show you how you can methodically apply different techniques to your own algorithms to make them more efficient. While This course mostly highlights general techniques, some well-known algorithms are also looked at in depth. This course is written so it can be read from "cover to cover" in the length of a semester, where sections marked with a * may be skipped. This course is a tutorial on techniques and is not a reference. For references we highly recommend the tomes by [Knuth] and [CLRS]. Additionally, sometimes the best insights come from the primary sources themselves (e.g. [Hoare]). A wikibook is an undertaking similar to an open-source software project: A contributor creates content for the project to help others, for personal enrichment, or to accomplish something for the contributor's own work (e.g., lecture preparation).

7 hours

$1,990

Basic Computing Using Windows

About

A basic guide to using computers that run Windows®. Download the entire book as a PDF File. This can be done in two ways: you can right-click on the link "PDF version" and choose "Save target as" to save the PDF on your computer for viewing at any time or left-click on the link to view it without saving.

Contents

  • Computers and Peripherals
  • Operating Systems and Controls
  • The Desktop
  • File Systems
  • Concepts and Settings
  • Networks and the Internet
    • FTP
  • Email, Chat-rooms, and IM
  • Appendices
    • Switching the Control Panel to Classic View
    • Connecting to the Internet
    • Dual Booting

7 hours

$1,990

Knowing Knoppix

About

Knowing Knoppix is a guide to the Knoppix Linux distro for the complete beginner. Knoppix is an astoundingly clever product. It runs Linux completely from a CD, DVD or USB drive. There is no need to install. It bypasses all the software already installed on your PC or laptop and automatically detects the hardware in your computer (subject to suitable hardware). When you've finished using Knoppix, simply restart. Your computer will return to your regular system, and it will behave as if nothing has happened. Knoppix is Free Software and open source under the terms of the GNU General Public Licence (GPL). This beginner-friendly book is designed to help with these situations: To run Knoppix in full and follow the instructions in Knowing Knoppix, you need:

7 hours

$1,990

A Quick Introduction to Unix

About

Unix is an operating system designed for use on any kind of computer or computing device. Current versions of Unix are running on everything from supercomputers to mobile phones. It is a multi-tasking, multi-user system. This means that a person using a Unix system can run more than one job, that is do more than one task at once, and that more than one user can share the resources of a single Unix system. Multi-tasking is common on personal computers now, but it was not always and most desktop personal computers probably still run as single user systems. Some Unix systems have a graphical user interface (GUI) or graphical desktop environment similar to Microsoft Windows or Mac OS. Nonetheless, to take best advantage of Unix it is worth knowing something about how to use the system without the GUI. Many Unix systems are released under one or other of the ‘free’ software licences, such as the GPL. So, they are available to everyone at no cost while providing full freedom to use, adapt, and share all the tools of these powerful operating systems. Unix is also part of the underlying technology of the Internet. Although no operating systems has any exclusive claim to the Internet, many of the standard technologies, protocols and applications that make up the Internet were first developed on Unix systems. Unix is also an attractive tool for internetworking because it was designed to be a mult-user system from the outset. Many of the web servers that serve up the World Wide Web for example run a program called Apache under Unix.

7 hours

$1,990

Algorithm Implementation

About

The purpose of This course is to show how common algorithms are written in various programming languages, providing code implementations and explanation. The plan for This course is initially to collect code from some Wikipedia articles. Then the code can be expanded upon, perfected, and heavily commented to provide insight into how it works.

7 hours

$1,990

Aros

About

AROS is an recursive acronym for the AROS Research Operating System, an AmigaOS (TM) API compatible OS, with certain improvements, that is portable and freely available. It is developed as a collaborative project, with the source code being available under an open source license. AROS is not tied to any company policy or computer hardware. No financial or legal circumstances will have any negative effect on the progress of AROS. It has a secure future. Moreover AROS effort helps the Amiga community in general. Projects such as AfA-OS which improves the Classic Amiga OS and the free kickstart ROM which is useful in improving UAE (software), Minimig and FPGA Arcade(hardware) and others. As more Amiga 68k hardware and accelerators become scarce and expensive some thought was made to preserve the Amiga spirit. One approach out of many is AROS which can run on Motorola 68k, PowerPC, Intel x86 and compatibles, a select ARM SOCs. Where anyone can use an alternative to most mainstream Operating Systems (OS), for nostalgic reasons, educationally as an alternative to Linux, to experience new ideas or just be different.


7 hours

$1,990

Data Structures

About

This course is about the creation and analysis of efficient data structures. It covers: To understand the material in This course you should be comfortable enough in a programming language to be capable of working with and writing your own variables, arithmetic expressions, if-else conditions, loops, subroutines (also known as functions), pointers (also known as references or object handles), structures (also known as records or classes), simple input and output, and simple recursion. Because many different languages approach the construction of data structures differently, we use pseudo-code so that you can translate the code into your own language. A Wikibook is an undertaking similar to an open-source software project: A contributor creates content for the project to help others, for personal enrichment, or to accomplish something for the contributor's own work (e.g., lecture preparation). An open book, just like an open program, requires time to complete, but it can benefit greatly from even modest contributions from readers. For example you can fix "bugs" in the text (where the bug might be typographic, expository, technical, aesthetic or otherwise) in order to make a better book. If you find an opportunity to fix a bug, simply click on "edit", make your changes, and click on save. Other contributors may review your changes to be sure they are appropriate for the course. If you are unsure, you can visit the discussion page and ask there. Use common sense.

7 hours

$1,990

Digital Circuits

About

This course will serve as an introduction to Digital Circuits. This course will rely heavily on the concepts of Discrete Math, but will not require any previous knowledge of the subject because all necessary math concepts will be developed in the text. This course will, however, assume a knowledge of basic electrical principles such as current, voltage, and resistance, so the reader may want to brush up on their Circuit Theory. A mechanical engineer learns to think of everything as a spring. An electrical engineer starts off with building blocks of resistors (circuit theory) and NAND gates. From NAND gates, every part of a computer can be built. Most electronics purchased today contain a huge variety of special purpose chips including a CPU. Mass produced commercial circuits are cheaper to build this way. But digital design is typically implemented today in a chip that can be potentially turned into anything. Most digital courses today plunge straight into programming a FPGA. In any case "design" is important. This course focuses on the design and leaves the FPGA programming for another course.

7 hours

$1,990

Embedded Systems

About

This course is about microcontrollers, in the field of digital control systems. We will discuss embedded systems, real-time operating systems, and other topics of interest. It is important to realize that embedded systems rarely have display capabilities, and if they do have displays, they are usually limited to small text-only LCD displays. The challenge of programming an embedded system then is that it is difficult to get real-time feedback from the system without a display. It is common to use a simple serial interface for diagnostic purposes, for example by connecting to a PC running terminal software via a RS-232 to USB adapter. Also, embedded systems usually have very strict memory limitations, processor limitations, and speed limitations that must play a factor in designing an embedded system, and programming an embedded computer. This course talks about some of the specific issues involved in programming an embedded computer. It also covers some basic topics such as microprocessor architectures, FPGAs, and some general low-level computing topics. While many of the issues discussed in This course may apply to PCs, and non-embedded computers, This course remains focused on topics that apply to embedded systems only. This course has incorporated a number of smaller books, stub-books, and half-books that were previously written about this subject.

7 hours

$1,990

First steps towards system programming under MS-DOS 7

About

First steps towards system programming under MS-DOS7. This course is for those who intend to seize the most intimate secrets of modern computer technology. In order to be understood easily, narration starts with some elementary explanations and examples, but its main part presents professional level data with all relevant latest updates. These data will be beneficial for both students and teachers on computer technology as well as for computer maintenance staff, system programmers and developers of x86-platform microprocessor equipment. Contents

7 hours

$1,990

A Level Computer Science Programming Guide

About

This course is essentially a quick and easy lookup guide to easily study the components of the different programming languages required in the AS and A Level Computer Science course. It is not designed to teach you how to program, but rather to help you to remember and easily translate your code to the different languages. All Pseudocode in this guide is based on various Cambridge Mark Schemes and Help Guides, so it is as accurate as possible. When complete, the High-Level languages covered in this guide will be those that are set in the Cambridge syllabus; VB.Net, Python and Pascal/Delphi.

7 hours

$1,990

A Beginner's Guide to MS Windows Optimization

About

Purpose of the guide: Fast and comprehensive tips, how to speed up your PC with MS Windows. Its written for normal(non-geek) people, so the geeks don't have to help them do the same thing over and over and over and over again. Why should I read this?: Have you noticed that your PC is working much slower than it used to? I mean MUCH slower? That you have time to make dinner before some programs start? There may be a solution for this problem not involving purchases of a new PC, or spending money on support, or buying programs(possibly buying more RAM memory). Try to read through the whole guide and try to understand it, most of the words/terms that you don't understand can easily be found Googleing or on Wikipedia. Why did I write this?: Well, the reasons are many, but the main one being to help people with the common problem of slow computers. I tried to write this as easy as possible, keeping the text usable for the normal PC user. The text contains my own points of view, mainly to help people on the right track, so please don't delete them. One more thing before we start, as a normal user you should know that the PC is a very complex electronic device, and you may be required to read other articles to fully understand this guide. If you are using a PC you need to know what a processor(CPU) and hard drive(HDD) is, I am sorry. Having a drivers license you most probably know what the engine does in the car, and what wheels are responsible for, without knowing more complex structures. Its the same in the PC, just the basics. And remember, this is just a guide, every PC is different, I will just try to give you the tools, and the rest is up to you, and all you do is on your own risk. So please, don't skip Step 1.

7 hours

$1,990

Chip Design Made Easy

About

In This course Chip Design we tell how to build an integrated circuit ("chip") by integrating billions of transistors to achieve an application. An application could be suiting a particular requirement like microprocessor, router, cell phone,etc. An integrated circuit designed for a specific application is called as ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuits). Today's ASIC Chips are pretty complex, packed with larger chunk of transistors targeted to a specific manufacturing process for fabricating the integrated circuits, in a sub nanometer regime, involving many challenges like knowledge of various protocols, architectures, models, formats, standards, knowledge about CMOS logic, Digital Design concepts, taming the EDA tool for the various design requirements like area, timing, power, thermal, noise, routability, lithography aware, knowledge about various variabilities like channel length, Vt, line width variations, lens aberrations, IR drop effects, inter-die and intra die-variations, effects, and various noise-effects like package noise, EMI noise, power grid noise, cross-talk noise, and ability to test and validate and know to model and characterize all these effects upfront in the design-phase, steps to increase profitability curve, with short span of time-to market to minimize the risk and maximize the predictability and an modular approach to success. Now let's delve in to the "Art of Chip Designing". That is a lot of technical jargon, but there is nothing to worry about. You will soon learn what that means, and understand the concepts behind chip designing. Why an Analogy with Building Architecture? To understand the concepts of Chip designing in a better way, as we are very familiar with Building Architecture, then it will be easy for us to map Chip Design architecture.

7 hours

$1,990

Digital Signal Processing

About

With the explosion of digital communications and digital media, the need for methods to process digital data is more important than ever. This course will begin with a look at the mathematical concepts behind digital processing, then will build on that with particular algorithms to do the work, and finally will present the actual implementations of these techniques in today's hardware and software systems. Many real-world algorithms are based on the techniques described in this course. JPEG images, MP3 songs, MPEG-2 videos, and ZIP files are all processed using digital processing techniques, and all of them will be discussed, at least conceptually. This course will not teach programming, and will probably not even provide much in the way of actual code, so we don't need to worry much about computer language dependence, except where otherwise noted. For some solid background information on the various mathematical theories in this course, consider reading Signals and Systems. This course is in a very early stage of production, and many of the pages either don't exist or only exist as bare stubs. Help and contributions from all wikibookians will be very much appreciated! channel of noises

7 hours

$1,990

Evolution of Operating Systems Designs

About

This course is about operating systems concepts as they have evolved through the history of operating systems implementations. Politics and implementation details are irrelevant. Emphasis is given to technically successful designs, aesthetic operating systems, and not on commercial success. In fact, mere commercial success isn't sufficient to make an operating system noteworthy. It also emphasizes working implementations over mere projects.

7 hours

$1,990

Expert Systems

About

This course is about expert systems, their use, and their construction. Expert systems are AI computer programs that use the knowledge and processes of a human expert to solve problems that computers have been incapable of solving efficiently. This course is designed for students at the undergraduate level in the fields of computer science or computer engineering. Students are expected to have a background in high-level programming languages, although no single language is preferred.

7 hours

$1,990

Finite Model Theory

About

Finite Model Theory (FMT) is a subarea of Model Theory (MT). MT is the branch of mathematical logic which deals with the relation between a formal language (syntax) and its interpretations (semantics). FMT is a restriction of MT to finite structures, such as finite graphs or strings. Since many central theorems of MT do not hold when restricted to finite structures, FMT is quite different from MT in methods and application areas. FMT has become an "unusually effective" instrument in computer science, for example in database theory, model checking or for gaining new perspectives on computational complexity. The three main areas of FMT are presented here: Expressive Power of Languages, Descriptive Complexity, and Random Structures. But first the results fundamental for all areas are introduced on the level of first order languages. Why? (Motivation) What is it? (Definition and Background)

7 hours

$1,990

Floating Point

About

This course discusses the IEEE 754 standard concerning floating-point numbers. Beginning chapters of This course focus on newcomers to the standard, who wish to understand and make use of floating point numbers, especially in a programming project. Later chapters of This course, however, focus more on the details of implementation of the IEEE 754 standard. This way, advanced users who want more details, or users who are working to create a floating-point implementation of their own can find the information they need. This course can be used as an ancillary reference source to support other books in the computer science and engineering fields. Programming examples found in This course attempt to use pseudocode where possible, to prevent an over-reliance on any particular language or platform. Specific examples may utilize a single computer language or assembly language. Prerequisites to This course include an understanding of exponents and Algebra, and an understanding of binary number representation.

7 hours

$1,990

Know FreeNAS Fundamentals

About

FreeNAS is an embedded open-source NAS (Network-Attached Storage) distribution based on FreeBSD. FreeNAS can be installed on Compact Flash/USB key, hard drive or booted from LiveCD. 

Content

  • Base System
  • Network Protocols supported
  • Extra services
  • Hard drive / volume management
  • Network
  • Monitoring

 


7 hours

$1,990

How To Backup Operating Systems

About

This is a step-by-step guide for backing up and restoring the operating system(s) installed on your PC (Linux, Windows, etc). Specifically, it describes how to back up and restore hard drive partitions and MBR boot code using free tools and discusses backup and restoration procedures and scenarios. Backup and restoration take about 10 minutes each. Uses and benefits include: In short, this is a relatively easy procedure well worth taking the time to learn! Mastering this technique takes most of the fear out of system changes - you know how to press the 'rewind' button on everything you do, and the rewind button works reliably and quickly. What OS(es) you're running doesn't matter. The only limitations are the filesystems being used and the amount of data involved. Most Linux and Windows systems are supported for backup. While some of the tools in this guide are available for use on Macs, this guide does not cover Mac backups specifically. This guide supports the following filesystems (at least): ext2/3/4, reiserfs, reiser4, btrfs, xfs, jfs, vfat, fat16/32, ntfs, iso9660. Note that encrypted partitions cannot be backed up using the methods in this guide.

7 hours

$1,990

Programming AI with Leaf

About

Have you ever wanted to create artificial intelligence software (AI) but did not know where to start? Have you wanted to put this AI into a robot? If so Leaf is for you. Leaf is the AI software that starts you with a working AI framework that you add to and customize as you wish. It was put together by the Leaf Project, a group robot development program whose objective is to develop a robot platform that supports experiments with artificial intelligence, vision, voice recognition, navigation, etc.

Contents

  1. Overview
  2. Installing
  3. Creating Your Own Leaf (Customizing Leaf)
  4. Face Recognition with Eigenfaces
  5. Adding to Leaf: the SD84 Servo Controller
  6. Adding to Leaf: the ALICE Chatbot
  7. Q&A (Ask a question!/)
  8. Leaf's Creators
  9. Sources for LEAF Robot Parts

7 hours

$1,990

Visualizing Computation

About

Diagrams play a central role in communication in many fields, and computer science is no exception—our classroom lectures, research talks, textbooks, and Wikipedia pages are full of visual material to complements to our words. The forms of these diagrams are typically defined vaguely if at all. While this may be appropriate in a lecture setting, uncertainty about the diagram can lead to confusion as students study their notes or books. Visualizing Computation is an archive of definitions of useful visualization techniques that are often used in lectures without extensive discussion. Each page of This course covers a particular approach to visualizing some aspect of the execution of software. Each page should serve as a stand-alone definition of the diagram style, but not a complete description of the system being visualized. For example, Visualizing Computation describes diagrams that can be used to illustrate stack frame layout or evolving stack frame layouts, but leaves the definition and use of stack frames for the Wikipedia call stack entry or professor's lectures. The visualizations themselves may be static illustrations of static entities, techniques for capturing evolution-over-time in a static image, or (in principle) animations. This course is designed to collect topics too specialized even for Wikipedia's notability policy ("Wikipedia is not a directory of everything in existence"). In particular, descriptions of interesting local variations in drawing style are encouraged, not discouraged. This project itself stems from repeated observations by Wonnacott's students at Haverford College, who pointed out the difficulties of taking good notes when the professor keeps erasing and overwriting the same diagram.

7 hours

$1,990

ATRIAS 2.1 Handbook

About

ATRIAS 2.1 is the third physical realization of the ATRIAS concept of an actuated spring mass walking, running and jumping bipedal robot. ATRIAS 2.1 is designed for un-tethered, 3D walking and running over unpredictable, rough terrain while maintaining a reasonably high energy economy. Future work with this robot will be to develop and demonstrate these goals and further scientific knowledge in the field of legged locomotion.

7 hours

$1,990

Geographic Information Systems

About

Geographic Information Systems provide a method for integrating and analyzing spatial (digital map based) information such as "where is the nearest movie theater?" alongside related non-spatial information (what movies are playing there?). GIS have three major capabilities (computer mapping, spatial analysis and spatial database) and can operate on a range of platforms (desktop/laptop computer, Internet, PDA, etc.). Many people are becoming far more familiar with seeing the results both textually - for example when their phone shows them the nearest pub - and on open map systems such as Google Maps. Where in the past people had to literally use pencils and string on a paper map to find their nearest school, a computer can do this now extremely quickly an accurately, as long as all the information has been entered correctly in the first place. In a broader context, GIS involves people and often brings a philosophy of change. For example, in 1994, the New York Police Department introduced GIS to locate crime 'hot-spots', analyze underlying problems and devise strategies and solutions to deal with the problems. Since 1993, violent crime has dropped by two-thirds in New York City.[1] This strategy, known as COMPSTAT, has expanded to cities and jurisdictions across the United States and around the world. One leading GIS software vendor is ESRI, based in Redlands, California, which offers ArcGIS for the desktop, ArcGIS Server for Internet mapping, ArcPad for PDAs and a range of other products and services for developers. Other popular GIS software packages are available from Cadcorp, Intergraph, MapInfo, Manifold and Autodesk. ERDAS Imagine, ENVI, Idrisi, and PCI Geomatica are geared towards remote sensing i.e. analysis of satellite/aircraft images. There are many third-party extensions and utilities for ArcGIS and other GIS and raster software platforms. Currently, open source GIS software options can be chosen from the first OS GIS package GRASS, recent open source options are DIVA GIS, Quantum GIS, and uDig. There are efforts underway, through the Open GIS Consortium to provide interoperability among spatial data formats and software. The leading contender for spatial data storage is another open source package called PostGIS, which is a spatial extension to the open source database PostgreSQL.

7 hours

$1,990

GNewSense

About

gNewSense is a free GNU/Linux operating system. In this case, free refers to freedom like free speech rather than free beer, which means you're allowed to do the following with gNewSense: gNewSense is great as it offers you the four freedoms as stated above. Well you can use Windows or OS X for any purpose you want. People who protect us, like police and army, use them; terrorists use Windows and OS X, too. The good news is that gNewSense can be used for anything, to create, to protect and to destroy. So gNewSense is leveled with competitive operating systems. Now let's talk about the second point of free software: to distribute it freely to your friends, and possibly enemies to get their good will, to family and loved ones. With gNewSense you can distribute the operating system because it's free(dom). If you distribute Windows or OS X, you will still be happy if you like to count bars behind prison. You will be called a pirate, criminal and possibly enemy of the state. If the above paragraph shocked you, then we must remind you that we are not kidding. It could happen to you if you use Windows or OS X. So you'd better start using gNewSense or risk facing the cold shoulder of society. In court you could argue that you had purchased Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X for yourself and that you have the right to do anything you want with what you own. Well the bad news is even if you have purchased a copy of a proprietary Operating System, you do not own it.

7 hours

$1,990

Mac OS X Leopard

About

This course is a comprehensive guide to Mac OS X Leopard, the 6th version of the operating system that runs on Apple's Macintosh computers. Its successors were Snow Leopard (2009), Lion (2011), and Mountain Lion (2012). This course is written for both new and experienced users alike. If you are a new Mac user, you can use This course to familiarize yourself with the Mac environment. If you are a more experienced user, you can use it to learn about advanced features that will make using your Mac easier and more enjoyable. However, This course cannot be everything for everyone. If you have never used a computer before, you should learn the basics of computing before you read This course. Likewise, if you already know Mac OS X like the back of your hand and want to learn about the operating system's underpinnings, you probably won't find what you're looking for here. This course includes a thorough discussion of the Mac OS and its included applications. It does not discuss iLife or iWork, suites of multimedia and productivity applications, because they are technically not parts of the Mac OS. Please refer to the course iLife for information on these applications.

7 hours

$1,990

Discover Release Management

About

Release Management refers to management of the release cycle within a software project, which itself is when the software engineers provide a uniquely identified set of files for others to use. The others may be their department at work, their classmates at university, or The World. The set of files (perhaps a single file) constitute the software release. Managing the release means the software release manager knows: Building software is the generic term applied to the compilation or aggregation of sources into a usable utility or application. Sources needn't be compiled (built) in the classic sense, which relies upon a compiler linking files together; modern systems may consist entirely of interpreted source files (such as those for Perl or PHP). Still, putting everything together in a usable format may be considered "building". The larger and more complex the software project becomes, the greater the need for an extremely well-managed Build and Release function. Several features are characteristic of the Build and Release process. The most common are use of overnight builds, normalized build numbering, high degrees of automation, scheduling and reuse, use of notification, metadata capture and storage, and implementation of a project portal or viewer.

Content

  • Overnight builds
  • Competent Build Numbering
  • Automation
  • Auto-generated Build Numbers
  • Scheduling
  • Reuse
  • Notification
  • Project Portal
  • Database storage

7 hours

$1,990

Self-Replicating Automata

About

This course is intended to primarily deal with detailed study of self-replicating code, "popularly" known as computer viruses. There is an obvious lack of academic material available on this topic. It is indeed interesting how ingenious algorithms and techniques are being neglected by the academia in the name of legality. A quine is also a kind of self-replicating automaton, except for the fact that rather than reproducing itself in the executable format, it produces as output the source code for the program. For more details see quine program. There has long been speculation about a self-replicating machine. The RepRap Project is currently attempting to build the first generation of just such a device. In 1986, Drexler suggested the possibility of grey goo, an end-of-the-world scenario in which self-replicating robots consume all matter on earth while making more of themselves.

7 hours

$1,990

Windows: An Overview

About

At the time of this era, the Microsoft Windows family of operating systems runs the vast majority of the world's home computers. How did Windows rapidly become the dominant operating system for home use on the planet? Microsoft Windows began as a GUI add-on to DOS. The early versions of Windows required DOS to be installed first. The first version that did not require DOS to be pre-installed was Windows 95. Early on, Windows split into two branches - the DOS-based branch and the NT based branch. Today, The DOS-based branch has been discontinued due to bugs (errors in software), Lack of hardware support, and instability. All versions of Windows since Windows NT 3.1 (these are Windows NT 3.1, NT 4.0, Windows 2000, XP, Vista, 7, and 8) are NT based. Here are the predecessors to Microsoft Windows 95 in the order of release: Windows 1.0 Windows 2.0

7 hours

$1,990

Machine Translation

About

Machine translation (MT) is a discipline within Natural language processing (NLP) or more broadly Artificial intelligence (AI). It is one of the oldest computationals tasks: the first algorithms for MT were run on the first computers alongside with algorithms for cryptography and physical simulations as early as in 1940s. Shortly after, MT was dominated by rule-based approach which was replaced in 1990s by statistical approach only to be replaced by neural network methods in 2010s. This course is a guide to the Machine Translation. It is intended for everybody interested in how machine translation works, its history, limitations, quality and the current trends in the field.

This course is organized as follows:

  • Introduction
  • History
  • Rule-based Machine Translation
  • Statistical-based Machine Translation
  • Neural Machine Translation
  • Evaluation of Machine Translation

7 hours

$1,990

Adriane-Manual

About

Notes to This course ADRIANE stands for "audio desktop reference implementation and networking environment" and is an acoustic menu system, which aims to facilitate blind and severely visually impaired people use the computer and the launch of accessible programs (low barrier). Adriane is integral part of the KNOPPIX live GNU/Linux system and can be started running the boot option “Adriane” within the download version. Alternatively, the KNOPPIX versions containing “Adriane” as part of their file name will start running the audio desktop without special boot options. The main menu system by Adriane contains a selection of programs for Internet applications (e.g. E-Mail, WWW), text processing, creating notes, contact management and SMS-functionality for some mobile phones. If you are using the Adriane version of Knoppix it starts automatically. Otherwise you will have to type "Adriane" when the boot screen is shown. First you will hear the speech output reporting the first menu item "Help with enter key, arrow key down for next menu". By pressing enter you will reach a help window, which explains the basic language output functions. Here you can also select individual functions and components. With the ARROW down key you can reach the other programs and step through the menu. The menu system is designed "flat", which means that programs are located at the first level. In most cases pressing the ENTER key will open the program, in some cases it’s a window with further information or options. This is to keep operation as clear and easily as possible. You can navigate via the ARROW keys and the ENTER key to select an option. The marked menu item will be highlighted and spoken by speech output. The ESCAPE key will always lead you one menu and level higher. Normally this key is located on the upper left corner of the keyboard.

7 hours

$1,990

Conversational bots

About

Conversational bots are programs that carry out a conversation with users. This tutorial will guide you through the basics of creating a simple conversational bot that analyses natural language input. In what follows we will use the Go programming language in code examples. To test out your code, you can use this free iOS app in conjunction with a server on which your code is running.

7 hours

$1,990

Mathematical Proof and the Principles of Mathematics

About

This course aims to teach you the elements of pure mathematics in a self-contained, accessible style. The main objective is to introduce the reader to material usually found in an undergraduate course intended for mathematics majors at a university. In fact, many universities offer a course that serves as a transition from calculus to courses which involve more abstract concepts and writing proofs, and This course might serve as a text for such a course. It's also intended for people who are considering mathematics, especially pure mathematics, as a career or serious avocation, and wish to know what to expect as they advance to higher levels. We also intend to introduce the reader to style of proofs and rigor needed to read and write mathematical literature. The material is covered in greater detail and more rigorously than you may be used to. In fact much of the material will already be familiar, though the approach to it may not. In the experience of most people, mathematics consists mostly of the mechanical application of rules of computation at various levels: arithmetic, solving equations, finding derivatives and integrals. But for a mathematician, mathematics is a process for discovering and establishing truths. It requires an analytical mind, but also a certain amount of creativity and intuition. It can also be, as we hope you'll discover Through this course, very rewarding. Introduction →

7 hours

$1,990

Operating System Fundamentals

About

Operating systems are typically segregated into kernel and userland. The Kernel provides a layer for the software to interact with the hardware. It abstracts the hardware allowing a lot of software to run identically on very different hardware. The kernel provides system calls to allow the userland to interact with it. The kernel handles many things including filesystems (not always but typically), devices, and control of processes. The userland exists as everything else other than the kernel. All processes created by the user including the terminal exist in userland. The Graphical User Interface (GUI) that displays programs lives in userland. The Unix shell is a command interpreter program that serves as the primary interface between uses and the OS in a command line environment, e.g. a terminal or terminal simulator. A shell is an essential (often preferred) tool, but it is just a ordinary user program that uses system calls to get most of the work done - so its just a "shell". Many shells exist in the modern era, each with their own set of features. The most common is the bourne shell. The bourne shell (known colloquially by it's POSIX location as /bin/sh) has been around for many decades now and may be found on essentially any Unix computer. While it lacks certain interactivity features, it's so commonplace that any script written for it will run on essentially any Unix system.

7 hours

$1,990

Operating Systems

About

An operating system is software that manages and organises that computer's resources and basic functions, including: Operating system Unix was developed by a group of employees from Bell Labs under the guidance of Dennis Ritchie, Ken Thompson and Brian Kernighan in 1969. This operating system was created under the fundamentals of simplicity as they had few people working on the project and wanted to complete it relatively quickly. The design standards set by Unix paved the way for the modern computing world (except Windows). At the end of 1970's, the University of California, Berkeley made a number of improvements to the source code of UNIX, including the work with protocols of TCP/IP. Their work was known as BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution). It spread under licence, allowing to refine and improve the product and transfer the result to third parties, with or without source codes, provided that authorship of the code written in Berkeley is indicated. While there was some legal trouble, the case was ruled in favor of the Regents of California and that set a precedent that Unix-like operating systems are not under copyright so long as they contain no original Unix source code. Thus the BSD project had to remove all Unix based code from 4.4 BSD terming their new creation 4.4BSD lite. This BSD was limited in features so projects like FreeBSD and NetBSD sprung up to fill in the gaps. In the beginning of the 1990s, a student from Helsinki University Linus Torvalds started kernel development for IBM computers, that was known as w:Linux\Linux. Currently, GNU/Linux (a set of different distributions built on the basis of the Linux kernel) ranks second in popularity among OSs used on user desktops (first place belongs Microsoft Windows)

7 hours

$1,990

Support Vector Machines

About

Support vector machines (SVMs) are a set of related supervised learning methods that analyze data and recognize patterns, used for classification and regression analysis. The original SVM algorithm was invented by Vladimir Vapnik and the current standard incarnation (soft margin) was proposed by Corinna Cortes and Vladimir Vapnik [1]. The standard SVM is a non-probabilistic binary linear classifier, i.e. it predicts, for each given input, which of two possible classes the input is a member of. Since an SVM is a classifier, then given a set of training examples, each marked as belonging to one of two categories, an SVM training algorithm builds a model that predicts whether a new example falls into one category or the other. Intuitively, an SVM model is a representation of the examples as points in space, mapped so that the examples of the separate categories are divided by a clear gap that is as wide as possible. New examples are then mapped into that same space and predicted to belong to a category based on which side of the gap they fall on. More formally, a support vector machine constructs a hyperplane or set of hyperplanes in a high or infinite dimensional space, which can be used for classification, regression or other tasks. Intuitively, a good separation is achieved by the hyperplane that has the largest distance to the nearest training data points of any class (so-called functional margin), since in general the larger the margin the lower the generalization error of the classifier. Whereas the original problem may be stated in a finite dimensional space, it often happens that in that space the sets to be discriminated are not linearly separable. For this reason it was proposed that the original finite dimensional space be mapped into a much higher dimensional space presumably making the separation easier in that space. SVM schemes use a mapping into a larger space so that cross products may be computed easily in terms of the variables in the original space making the computational load reasonable. The cross products in the larger space are defined in terms of a kernel function K ( x , y ) {\displaystyle K(x,y)} which can be selected to suit the problem. The hyperplanes in the large space are defined as the set of points whose cross product with a vector in that space is constant. The vectors defining the hyperplanes can be chosen to be linear combinations with parameters α i {\displaystyle \alpha _{i}} of images of feature vectors which occur in the data base. With this choice of a hyperplane the points x in the feature space which are mapped into the hyperplane are defined by the relation: ∑ i α i K ( x i , x ) = c o n s t a n t {\displaystyle \sum _{i}{\alpha _{i}K(x_{i},x)}=constant} Note that if K ( x , y ) {\displaystyle K(x,y)} becomes small as y {\displaystyle y} grows further from x {\displaystyle x} , each element in the sum measures the degree of closeness of the test point x {\displaystyle x} to the corresponding data base point x i {\displaystyle x_{i}} . In this way the sum of kernels above can be used to measure the relative nearness of each test point to the data points originating in one or the other of the sets to be discriminated. Note the fact that the set of points x {\displaystyle x} mapped into any hyperplane can be quite convoluted as a result allowing much more complex discrimination between sets which are far from convex in the original space.

7 hours

$1,990

Windows Batch Scripting

About

This course describes and shows how to use the Microsoft-supplied command interpreter cmd.exe and the associated commands, and how to write Windows batch scripts for the interpreter. cmd.exe is the default interpreter on all Windows NT-based operating systems, including Windows XP, Windows 7 and Windows 10. This course addresses 32-bit Windows commands applicable to modern versions of Windows based on the Windows NT environment. It does not address commands that are specific to DOS environments and to DOS-based operating systems, such as Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows Me, whose Microsoft-supplied command interpreters are in fact DOS programs, not Win32 programs. You can find out which version of Windows you are running using the VER command. This course first describes using the Windows NT command interpreter, how it receives, parses, and processes commands from users. Then it describes various commands available. To obtain an extensive list of Windows commands and their short summaries, open the command prompt on any Windows computer, and type help. To find out about a particular command, type the name of the command followed by "/?".

7 hours

$1,990


Is learning Computer Science hard?


In the field of Computer Science learning from a live instructor-led and hand-on training courses would make a big difference as compared with watching a video learning materials. Participants must maintain focus and interact with the trainer for questions and concerns. In Qwikcourse, trainers and participants uses DaDesktop , a cloud desktop environment designed for instructors and students who wish to carry out interactive, hands-on training from distant physical locations.


Is Computer Science a good field?


For now, there are tremendous work opportunities for various IT fields. Most of the courses in Computer Science is a great source of IT learning with hands-on training and experience which could be a great contribution to your portfolio.



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