Computing Courses Online

Live Instructor Led Online Training Computing courses is delivered using an interactive remote desktop! .

During the course each participant will be able to perform Computing exercises on their remote desktop provided by Qwikcourse.


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Computing Training


OpenSSH

About

The OpenSSH suite provides secure remote access and file transfer.[1] Since its initial release, it has grown to become the most widely used implementation of the SSH protocol. During the first ten years of its existence, SSH has largely replaced older corresponding unencrypted tools and protocols. The OpenSSH client is included by default in most operating system distributions, including MacOS, AIX, Linux, BSD, and Solaris. Any day you use the Internet, you are using and relying on hundreds if not thousands of machines operated and maintained using OpenSSH. A survey in 2008 showed that of the SSH servers found running, just over 80% were OpenSSH. [2] Even with the advent of the Internet of Things and the increased use of IPv6, a cursory search of Shodan [3] for SSH-2.0 services on port 22 in April 2017 showed 56% of responding IPv4 addresses running OpenSSH. [4] OpenSSH was first released towards the end of 1999. It is the latest step in a very long and useful history of networked computing, remote access, and telecommuting. This course is for fellow users of OpenSSH to help save effort and time through using OpenSSH, and especially SFTP, where it makes sense to use it.  

7 hours

$1,990

Structured Query Language

About

Structured Query Language (SQL) is a widely-used programming language for working with relational databases. The name of the language is generally pronounced as the three letters of its abbreviation ˈɛs kjuː ˈɛl or, in some people's usage, as ˈsiːkwəl. This course provides a short description of SQL, its origins, basic concepts and components, and many examples. the course follows the specifications of the SQL:2011 standard developed by a common committee of ISO and IEC. Their publications are not freely available but can be ordered online.[1] Or you may want to refer to a working draft that you can download from Whitemarsh Information Systems Corporation.

7 hours

$1,990

GCSE Computer Science

About

This is a course about GCSE Computer Science. The aim is it should be useful as a revision guide or to find alternative explanations to the ones in your course. This course is not the work of a single author. We welcome both students and teachers to improve This course by adding and making changes. Explaining to someone else is one of the best ways to learn. This course does not teach any specific programming language per se, but rather uses pseudocode and flowchats to introduce programmng. There are plenty of other wikibooks available which deal adequately with each of the programming languages you might choose to use in studying GCSE Computer Science. You may access the content above of a particular courses by selecting course below (if you are not sure which is your course ask your teacher). These apart from the course introduction below these do not introduce new content but rather connect to the relevant parts of the above content: The courses below are not longer taught, but may be of interest some.

7 hours

$1,990

Unicode

About

The objective of This course is to maintain a reference to Unicode encoding and anything related to Unicode specification. This course is necessary because, although the articles here about Unicode reference were removed from Wikipedia and Wikisource, this standard is widely used by IT technologies and a reference is very necessary. Unicode is an industry standard whose goal is to provide the means by which text of all forms and languages can be encoded for use by computers through a single character set. Originally, text-characters were represented in computers using byte-wide data: each printable character (and many non-printing, or "control" characters) were implemented using a single byte each, which allowed for 256 characters total. However, globalization has created a need for computers to be able to accommodate many different alphabets (and other writing systems) from around the world in an interchangeable way. The old encodings in use included ASCII or EBCDIC, but it was apparent that they were not capable of handling all the different characters and alphabets from around the world. The solution to this problem was to create a set of "wide" 16-bit characters that would theoretically be able to accommodate most international language characters. This new charset was first known as the Universal Character Set (UCS), and later standardized as Unicode. However, after the first versions of the Unicode standard it became clear that 65,535 (216) characters would still not be enough to represent every character from all scripts in existence, so the standard was amended to add sixteen supplementary planes of 65,536 characters each, thus bringing the total number of representable code points to 1,114,112. To this date, less than 10% of that space is in use. Unicode (Q8819)

7 hours

$1,990

Backstage Projects: Support and Policymaking in Collaborative Cyberspace

About

Please feel free to check in at the discussion page! Backstage projects [1] are online collaborative software enterprises which provide intellectual and technical infrastructure and support for the ongoing activities of collaborative online projects such as wikipedia, wikiversity, etcetera. As various parties replicate the model, the best management practices (BMP's) developed at Wikimedia Foundation projects will be implemented worldwide and thus so too will be the BMP of backstage projects. All of these collaborative projects use similar software and encounter similar issues. They include private, advertising supported wikis which users utilize as they wish, and focused open projects such as meatballwiki, wikionwiki[2]Ubuntu Team Wiki[3]. Independent Media Center (IMC) is itself is not a wiki, although it is an open collaborative media project, but it uses a backstage project for production of technical and administrative documentation as well as discussion. Wikimedia Outreach is an offshoot of WikiMedia and is focused on building the numerical strength of foundation projects. It purports to serve as a home for multiple outreach and collaborative initiatives with "a bookshelf, a collection of best practices, and a coordination point for any activity that is directed to the public, to cultural institutions or to universities."[4] Strategic planning for wikimedia projects is an outgrowth of metawiki. In July 2009, the project began the first strategy-development project with the intention of producing a five-year strategic plan for the entire Wikimedia movement. More than 1,000 people from around the world contributed in more than 50 languages. Technologies deployed included IRC, [[Skype, mailing lists and wiki pages. The Bridgespan Group provided data andanalysis. Other important participants included Eugene Eric Kim of Blue Oxen Associates and Wikipedian Philippe Beaudette.[5]

7 hours

$1,990

Computer Literacy

About

This course is a guide to teaching computer literacy, the ability to take full advantage of computers, software, Internet, and online resources. Computer literacy classes usually precede more advanced topics like programming, digital literacy, and information literacy. Since computers are everywhere, people are usually introduced to them as little children. This course is therefore aimed at children aged 6-10 or more precisely the teachers and parents who lead them. This course can be nevertheless used for independent study by older children and adults. Style is suitable for young children with little text, lots of images, and short tasks. Despite easy access to computers, children tend to use them in a very limited way to consume content like movies and games. This course aims to expand their horizons, to get their feet wet, so to speak. It focuses on discovery in the spirit of "ma, look what the computer can do!". There are no drills, tests, or deep dives in This course, because they would just drain time and patience that is better used to discover more of the seemingly infinite computing landscape. Teachers and parents are advised to read the Foreword that gives more reasoning for structure and style of the course. Contributors should review Contributing chapter.

7 hours

$1,990

GCSE Computing

About

This is a course about GCSE Computing. It aims to fit in with the OCR GCSE Computing syllabus but is not endorsed by OCR. It should be useful as a revision guide or to find alternative explanations to the ones in your textbook. If you haven't heard of GCSEs then This course probably won't be of much interest to you but you can find out about them at Wikipedia. If any part of This course is unclear or even wrong then please post a comment on the discussion page or simply fix it yourself! In particular, please say if the course assumes any knowledge or skills which not all GCSE Computing students have. The course contains three units. All units must be completed to be awarded the GCSE Computing. The available units are:

7 hours

$1,990

High performance computing

About

What is HPC High-Performance Computing or HPC, is the application of "supercomputers" to computational problems that are either too large for standard computers or would take too long. A desktop computer generally has a single processing chip, commonly called a CPU. A HPC system, on the other hand, is essentially a network of nodes, each of which contains one or more processing chips, as well as its own memory. Parallel Computing Programs for HPC systems must be split up into many smaller "programs" called threads, corresponding to each core. To piece the larger program together, the cores must be able communicate with each other efficiently, and the system as a whole must be organized well. Programs on HPC systems create a vast amount of data, which can be very difficult for standard file systems and storage hardware to deal with. Standard file systems, or those defined for personal use, might have an upper limit on file size, number of files, or total storage. HPC file systems must be able to grow to contain and quickly transfer large amounts of data. In addition to data in use, researchers often keep previous data for comparison or as a starting point for future projects. Older data is kept in archival storage systems. Kraken, for example, uses a magnetic tape storage system, which can store several petabytes (millions of gigabytes) of data.

7 hours

$1,990

Teaching Computer Literacy

About

This is a resource for anyone who is, or will be teaching the basics of computers to any type of beginner. The focus of This course is to provide: Currently we have "Lessons in Paint" which are good for most children, and anyone else who likes to draw. Lessons in Paint is great because many of the Windows features are teachable in Paint. These lessons are geared toward Windows PCs. The suggestions and lessons could be adapted to work with other operating systems. If you have or make a lesson plan around Mac or Linux, please let us know on the discussion page and we could create a place for it. Remember, you can edit or add information by simply clicking on the “edit” tab at the top of any page or any section. Don’t worry about mistakes, you will be able to preview before saving. Also other users of can refer to previous versions and fix mistakes. If you are interested in the development of This course click on the “discussion” tab on any page to see what we are working on, and to contribute to the discussion. Mouse Familiarity

7 hours

$1,990

Cluster Fundamentals

About

The goal of the course is to outline the basic concepts about computer clusters. Firstly what exactly a cluster is and how to build a simple and clean cluster which provides a great starting point for more complex tasks. Also the handbook provides a guide for task scheduling and other important cluster management features. For the practical part most of the examples use Qlustar. Qlustar is a all-in-one cluster operating system that is easy to setup, extend and most importantly operate. A computer cluster consists of a number of computers linked together, generally through local area networks (LANs). All the connected component-computers work closely together and in many ways as a single unit. One of the big advantages of computer clusters over single computers, are that they usually improves the performance greatly, while still being cheaper than single computers of comparable speed and size. Besides that a cluster provides in general larger storage capacity, better data integrity. Nodes The term node usually describes one unit (linked computer) in a computer cluster. It represents the basic unit of a cluster. There a different types of nodes like head-nodes, compute-, cloud- or storage-nodes. Nodes in a cluster are connected through dedicated internal Ethernet networks. The figure below shows a simple setup of the components building a basic HPC Cluster.

 

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Software
    • The Problem
    • Distribution Packages
    • Personal Package Archives
      • How are PPAs used?
  • Qlustar
    • What is Qlustar?
      • Requirements
    • installation process
    • First boot of the OS
  • Cluster Monitoring
    • Icinga
      • Installation
      • Configuration
      • Usage
    • 4.2Ganglia
      • Installation
      • Configuration
      • Usage
  • SLURM
    • Batch-System overview
    • SLURM Basics
    • Setup
    • Mode of operation
      • Interactive
      • Jobscript
    • Installation
      • Package
      • Manually
    • Scheduler
      • Internal Scheduler
      • External Scheduler
    • Conclusion
  • Network
    • DHCP/DNS
    • NFS
    • Routing
  • OSSEC
    • File Integrity Checking
    • Rootkit Detection
    • Log Monitoring and Active Response
    • OSSEC Infrastructure
    • The OSSEC HIDS Analysis Process
      • Predecoding
      • Decoding and Rule Matching
    • Setup and Configuration
      • Setup of the Server
      • Setup of the Agent
    • The OSSEC Web User Interface
      • Setup
      • Functionality
    • Summary
  • Munin
    • Installation of the software Munin
    • Working with Munin
    • Munin errors and cleanup
  • SnortIDS
    • What is Snort?
      • Usage
    • Packages
      • LAMP-Server
      • BASE
    • Setup
      • LAMP-Server
      • Snort-Mysql
      • Acidbase
  • Prelude
    • What is Prelude?
      • Manager
    • Software Packages
    • Installation
      • Requirements
      • Step by Step Installation
      • Issues during installation
      • lack of access rights in step 8
      • PreSQL instead of mySQL
    • Prewikka
    • Useful websites
  • Firestarter
    • What is Firestarter?
      • Installation of Firestarter
      • Adaption of Firestarter
    • VPN-Connection
      • Firestarter Errors and Cleanup
  • Torque
    • Download Torque
    • Unzip file and navigate to the directory
    • Configure and install the package on the master
      • Set Directory
      • Set Library Folder
      • Perform Configure
    • Install Torque on the Nodes
      • Create packages
      • Install Package
    • Torque Konfigurieren
      • Initialise serverdb
      • Specify Nodes
    • Execute Job
      • Run Job
      • Useful Commands

 


28 hours

$7,960

Data Science: An Introduction

About

This course is a very basic introduction to data science. It is designed for the advanced high school student or average college freshman with a high school-level understanding of math, science, word processing and spreadsheets. No understanding of computer science is assumed. The main emphasis of This course is to help students think about the world in data science terms. While some elementary data science skills will be taught, the point is not skill development, but rather critical thinking and problem solving development. These are skills that can be successfully applied to all phases of life, not just data science. Data science--as a profession and as an academic discipline unto itself—is new, having been born in the first decade of the 21st century. It is a child born of the mature parental disciplines of scientific methods, data and software engineering, statistics, and visualization. This course is not intended to do justice to any of those disciplines by themselves, but to bring them together in a productive synthesis. As such, the student will be introduced to the parent disciplines and then given exercises that will fuse the parental disciplines into data science. In addition, "hacking" in the original positive sense of the term, is also a contributing parent to the data science child, even though "hacking" is not taught as an academic discipline. Obviously, a mature data scientist will be proficient in each of the parent disciplines, studying them individually and combining them to solve serious data problems. This text book is but just a first tentative step in that direction.

7 hours

$1,990

How to modify an eMac to use as an external monitor

About

Hardware hacking enthusiasts have talked about updating the eMac's logic board with a more modern Intel based logic board to make a Hackintosh while others have proposed using the eMac as a second monitor. Several have removed the CRT, analog boards and logic board replacing them by a single lcd display. This is described in the eMac LCD conversion personal page. Using the original CRT and analogs board has proven difficult because the IVAD board that is mounted directly to the back of the CRT needs to be initialized via its I2C interface before a VGA signal can be sent. The initialization sequence was finally recorded and then implemented in software using an arduino uno clone allowing the removal of the logic board. The pieMac is an apple eMac computer that has had the logic board removed and replaced by a raspberry pi. The pieMac was inspired by a thread on macrumors by patriciooholegu. The idea was to replace the logic board with a raspberry pi but this hack will allow the CRT to be used with just about any device that can provide a VGA signal at eMac resolutions and refresh rates. Images of how the components were arranged for this pieMac.

Content

  • Overview
  • pieMac
    • Component layout
  • Wiring The Video Connector
  • Wiring The Arduino

7 hours

$1,990

Methodology for code migration on many-core architecture

About

This course describes a step-by-step methodology to port legacy code on Many-Core Architectures. This methodology is used by High-performance computing (HPC) actors as part of HMPP Competence Centers. HMPP Competence Centers gather partners to address the many-core programming challenge at the technological (parallel programming, code tuning, etc.) and application levels. Porting code to many-core systems is a complex operation that requires many skills to be consolidated in order to achieve the plan results for a planned effort. From the computer science point of view, porting applications to a many-core target consists of providing an equivalent program that runs faster by exploiting parallelism at the hardware level. The goal is to improve the performance, without necessarily using all hardware components. If a serial code-based solution is the best, it should be considered. There are mainly two interleaved dimensions in migrating an application: In most cases, the starting point is a sequential legacy program. Its migration is necessary mainly because no automatic process can convert sequential code to a massive parallel version that exploits a large number of cores. Because the rapid evolution of the processor landscape makes software development more complex and usual parallel programming strategies will have to be modified to adapt existing applications in order to take advantage of these new processors.

7 hours

$1,990


Is learning Computing hard?


In the field of Computing learning from a live instructor-led and hand-on training courses would make a big difference as compared with watching a video learning materials. Participants must maintain focus and interact with the trainer for questions and concerns. In Qwikcourse, trainers and participants uses DaDesktop , a cloud desktop environment designed for instructors and students who wish to carry out interactive, hands-on training from distant physical locations.


Is Computing a good field?


For now, there are tremendous work opportunities for various IT fields. Most of the courses in Computing is a great source of IT learning with hands-on training and experience which could be a great contribution to your portfolio.



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