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Programming XIII Training


Lua Programming

About

Lua (not "LUA", which is incorrect although common) is a powerful, fast, lightweight and embeddable programming language. It is used by many frameworks, games and other applications. While it can be used by itself, it has been designed to be easy to embed in another application. It is implemented in ANSI C, a subset of the C programming language that is very portable, which means it can run on many systems and many devices where most other scripting languages would not be able to run. The purpose of This course is to teach Lua programming to anyone regardless of previous programming experience. the course can be used as an introduction to programming, for someone who has never programmed before, or as an introduction to Lua, for people who have programmed before but not in Lua. Since there are many development platforms and games that use Lua, This course can also be used to learn to use Lua and then to use it in that development platform. This course aims to teach usage of the latest version of Lua. This means it will be attempted to regularly update it as new versions of Lua come out (Lua releases are infrequent enough that this should not be too difficult). Currently, the course is up-to-date for Lua 5.2, which is the previous version. If you are using Lua in an embedded environment that uses an older version of Lua in the 5.x branch (Lua 5.0 and Lua 5.1), the material should still be sufficiently relevant for you. This course is divided into the following chapters and appendices:

7 hours

$1,990

Introduction to newLISP

About

Welcome to this introduction to newLISP! You'll find newLISP easy to learn and powerful, combining some of the power and elegance of classic LISP with the facilities of a modern scripting language, such as regular expressions, network functions, Unicode support, multitasking, and many others. This course is a straightforward and simple description of the basics of the language. You should be familiar with using a text editor, and ideally you'll have done a bit of scripting before, but previous programming experience or knowledge of LISP isn't required. I hope it's enough to get you started, and ready to start exploring the real power of newLISP. I'm writing this on a MacOS X system, but it shouldn't make any difference if you're using Linux, Windows, or one of the many other platforms that newLISP supports. The examples are designed to be run in newLISP version 10. This is an unofficial document—for the official and definitive description of newLISP refer to the excellent reference manual that is installed with the software. Thanks to everyone who has contributed to earlier versions of this document, by suggesting additions or finding errors. Keep them coming.

7 hours

$1,990

Programming Mac OS X with Cocoa for Beginners

About

This course aims to provide beginners with an introduction to programming Mac OS X Apps with Cocoa, using XCode, the free developer tools provided by Apple, Inc. Some knowledge of another programming language, preferably Objective C Programming is assumed. This course was written for users of Mac OS X 10.3 or 10.4, it should also work for newer versions of Mac OS X such as 10.5 and 10.6. For programming Mac OS X with Cocoa for Beginners using Mac OS X versions 10.7 "Lion", or 10.8 "Mountain Lion" or later, use the following wikibook instead: Programming Mac OS X with Cocoa for Beginners 2nd Edition It is suggested that you upgrade to 10.8, "Mountain Lion" because it is better supported by Apple. In general, this text is written to be followed in order from start to finish. As each topic develops, it builds on the code written previously to add complexity and functionality.

7 hours

$1,990

Rebol Programming

About

This course covers the basics of Rebol programming, what Rebol actually does and why it's designed the way it is. It's not a reference manual and therefore doesn't contain a complete overview of all functions, but aims to teach the mechanics and principles of the language to give you a deeper understanding of it. This is a wikibook, as such you should learn a bit about what it is and how it does its magic. the course is (or will be) organized into different parts (chapters), but as this is a work that is always evolving, things may be missing or just not where they should be, you are free to become a writer and contribute to fix things up. All Rebol developers who have interesting information are encouraged to come forward. It does not matter if you are not a stellar writer, as eventually it will be cleaned up. Although you can post to This course without registering, it is strongly advised that you do so so that we can discuss content which may be contentious. It is advised at this point to try and keep meanings within the realm of common understanding by the REBOL community. Anything outside that realm should be stated as such.

7 hours

$1,990

ACE+TAO Opensource Programming Notes

About

This course addresses issues related to TAO CORBA development and integration. First, a word or two about the nature of open source projects. The main benefit of an open source project is that you get a working product you can use, complete with community support. This support often takes the form of user's support as well as developer support. Ideally, these support avenues also include documentation. Should the open source project in question lack some of the pieces mentioned above, its utility as an open source product (particularly as the product becomes more complex) is necessarily diminished. ACE+TAO is a wonderful product which compares well to other open source products like Orbit or Mico. It encompasses much of the current standard and comes complete with all the services you would expect (and some extras too). Unfortunately, except for the most basic services (the naming service) there are precious few documented programming examples in their tutorial. While there are several source files in the examples directory, these are sadly not written with documented code (often without even a header describing the use for the example), and certainly not included in any web page explaining their code or use. Object Computing, Inc. freely provides the Getting Started chapter of their TAO Developer's Guide (that can be purchased for around $20.00). This chapter is complete with code examples and walks the user through the steps needed to make a simple TAO client and server. The open-source TAO 1.4a distribution contains all examples referenced in the TAO Developer's Guide, while the FAQ contains some helpful information for beginners and experts alike.

7 hours

$1,990

Game Maker Programming

About

Welcome to the Game Maker Programming tutorial at Wikibooks. Game Maker by Mark Overmars, which we deal with in these tutorials is not to be confused with GameMaker or The 3D Game Maker. Some of the chapters may be written using an older Game Maker version, so if the GUI does not look identical to your own, don't worry, these tutorials are all compatible with version 9. Game Maker is a game development software application written by Mark Overmars in the Delphi programming language. It is designed to allow its users to easily develop computer games without having to learn a complex programming language such as C++ or Pascal. For experienced users, Game Maker contains a built-in scripting programming language called "GML", or "Game Maker Language". Games can be distributed either free, or for profit, as ".gmk", ".gm6", or ".gmd" source files, or as standalone ".exe", ".jar", or ".html" files. To extend the Drag and Drop functionality of Game Maker, you can use files called Libraries to add new drag and drop items to the lists. These can be created by members with a special library builder, only available via the Game Maker Community, which has over 100,000 members. Game Maker is not as widely known or as used as other game development programs, such as the RPG School (RPG maker) series for Role-playing games. It has, however, attracted a substantial number of users; mainly because of the program's accessibility to beginners while still allowing complex tasks to be undertaken by more advanced users. It is not as narrow in game creation as other programs, as it allows the creation of many types of games, including platform games, first-person shooters, third-person shooters, multiplayer online games, simulation games, programs, and more.

7 hours

$1,990

Swift Introduction

About

This course is an introduction to Swift. Basic concepts like datatypes, variables and collection types are described in the second chapter. Advanced features like closures, properties and error handling are the topic of the third chapter. The concepts presented in This course are explained in short texts on the one hand and various code examples on the other hand. Therefore, This course helps the reader to quickly understand the described concepts. This course aims at people who are interested in iOS development and do not have any previous experience with Objective-C. All code examples can be found in this GitHub repository.

7 hours

$1,990

A Brief Introduction to the LaTeX Typesetting Environment

About

This course is to give a person who has never used the LaTeX environment before a crash-course in how to create a simple document quickly. We will not go into the details of more complicated things LaTeX can do, but instead will focus on the use of templates and the basic principles of what is going on behind the scenes. Ideally a beginner will be able to read the first few chapters and produce a document in the course of a few hours, then being proficient in the language henceforth. This course is also intended as a general reference to the simpler functions, declarations, and predefined control-sequences used in the LaTeX environment. Appendices will offer the reader an easy, logically ordered way of looking up the commands they want to find with examples where relevant. Using a project like Wikipedia or Wikibooks as the platform for a novel introduces the opportunity for a lot of new and wonderful concepts. First of all the course is a living one, there's no need to go buy a new edition if something changes or if typos are found and corrected, they'll be available online immediately. The most useful feature, in the author's humbler opinion, is the ability to add live references to literally every word of the document. While that won't be the case in this course, there will be references where necessary. The further reading section has links to more in-depth texts available online while certain keywords or concepts may link to their respective webpages or articles about them. At the same time, to add to the validity of each entry, references will be made and rather than looking them up yourself as in a normal, printed book, one can simply click the link and be taken to the reference.

 


7 hours

$1,990

Authoring Webpages

About

The World Wide Web (often simply called "the Web") is a means of communication using inter-linked pages of text called "web pages". A coherent group of such pages is called a "website". This short course will attempt to provide a hands-on approach to teach you how to make high-quality web pages. After a short introduction, you will be thrown in at the deep end and start making web pages yourself. Many courses approach the creation of webpages and websites as a computing task. Many others approach it as a graphical design challenge. Both approaches are rooted in treating the web as if it were a computational or graphical medium. Rooting the web in a understandable metaphor may be comforting, it is also misleading. The web is a new medium, that requires a completely new approach to building parts of it. Although students will often pick up some of the right concepts while studying the 'programming' and 'designing' books, it is often better to start with the right concepts, and deal with the computational and graphical aspects of the web later. What this course therefore tries to accomplish, is providing the student with a strong basis for learning more about building webpages. This course will try and do this in a practical, hands-on way. Almost from the get-go, students will start authoring their own webpages.

7 hours

$1,990

Octave Programming Tutorial

About

The purpose of this course is to get you through most (and eventually all) of the available Octave functionality from a basic level. A longer and more advanced Wikibook related to Octave Programming is the MATLAB Programming Wikibook. Those familiar with MATLAB that want to jump into Octave should consult MATLAB Programming/Differences between Octave and MATLAB. Indeed, Octave is often viewed as a system for numerical computations with a language that is mostly compatible with Matlab, but that is available as free software under the GNU GPL, and that can replace it in many circumstances.


21 hours

$5,970

OpenGL Programming

About

Welcome to the OpenGL Programming course. OpenGL is an API used for drawing 3D graphics. OpenGL is not a programming language; an OpenGL application is typically written in C or C++. What OpenGL does allow you to do is draw attractive, realistic 3D graphics with minimal effort. The API is typically used to interact with a GPU, to achieve hardware-accelerated rendering. You are free, and encouraged, to share and contribute to This course: it is written in the spirit of free documentation, that belongs to humanity. Feel free to make copies, teach it in school or professional classes, improve the text, write comments or even new sections. We're looking for contributors. If you know about OpenGL, feel free to leave comments, expand TODO sections and write new ones! "Modern" OpenGL is about OpenGL 2.1+, OpenGL ES 2.0+ and WebGL, with a programmable pipeline and shaders. Tutorial_drafts: ideas and notes for upcoming tutorials

7 hours

$1,990

Wiki-based archival description and storage

About

This course is a practical manual for organizations and individuals who have archives that they need to arrange, describe, digitize, and store — and who wish part of these archives to be part of "the sum of all knowledge" in the Wikimedia movement. It explains a system of safe, permanent storage for archival items that encompasses everything from initial accessioning and evaluation; through arrangement, description, and digitization (or digital conversion for digitally-created items); to techniques of shelving, boxing, and conservation. It includes details of how to manage collaborative (crowd-sourced) transcriptions on Wikisource, and the integration of knowledge from the archives into Wikipedia articles. If you are using the guidelines in This course to manage your archives, we invite you to also edit these pages as you learn what works and what doesn't, in order to share your knowledge with the rest of the community. You may also like to share your specific experiences by creating learning resources on Wikiversity. What do we mean by 'wiki-based'? Simply that the system described here makes use of the network of wiki sites operated by the Wikimedia movement, as well as the MediaWiki software that these sites run on. Being wiki-based in this way implies a few characteristics of an archival management system: it is web-based and spread across a number of different web sites; many people can contribute to it, and all their contributions are visible to each other and traceable; and that the supporting software is not as prescriptive of how the system works as is the case with a traditional archival database.

7 hours

$1,990

Message-Passing Interface

About

This course assumes you have previous knowledge about C programming and will present you Message-Passing Interface (MPI) by several examples. MPI is a standardized and portable message-passing system. Message-passing systems are used especially on distributed machines with separate memory for executing parallel applications. With this system, each executing process will communicate and share its data with others by sending and receiving messages. MPI is the specification resulting from the MPI-Forum which involved several organizations designing a portable system (that can allow programs to work on a heterogeneous network). Since the data can only be shared by exchanging messages, this standard is not intended for use on shared-memory systems, like a multiprocessor computer (although it will work, it is not the primary goal and there are more powerful alternatives, for instance, OpenMP). Basically, MPI includes point-to-point communication, collective communication (over a network of processes), process groups, bindings for Fortran and C and other advanced functions. On the other hand, the standard does not specify explicit shared-memory operations, debugging facilities, explicit support for threads, I/O functions. The current version is 2.0, although 1.1 is still used.

7 hours

$1,990

.NET Development Foundation

About

Welcome to the 'Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 Application Development Foundation' course. This course provides extensive "course like" coverage of the exam objectives associated with exam 70-536 of the Microsoft certification program. Those objectives cover the basic .NET class libraries and the interaction of a program with the .NET execution environment. The participants for this study course are software developers professionally interested in the .NET framework. Microsoft states in the Exam (70-536) preparation guide that "Candidates should have at least two to three years of experience developing Web-based, Microsoft Windows-based, or distributed applications by using the .NET Framework 1.0, the .NET Framework 1.1, and the .NET Framework 2.0. Candidates should have a working knowledge of Visual Studio 2005.". 


7 hours

$1,990

Amiblitz

About

Amiga Blitz Basic is amiblitz. A few features of Amiga Blitz Basic that make it distinctive are: Amiga Blitz Basic was originally developed as commercial software under the name of Blitz Basic and then Blitz Basic 2 by Simon Armstrong and Mark Sibley of Acid Software in New Zealand. It was later re-released as freeware under the GNU General Public License. More recently Bernd Roesch and others of Amiforce have continued development of the editor and compiler, under the name Amiblitz. Amiga Blitz Basic is free and can be downloaded http://www.amiforce.de The download file contains an installer and full instructions. Amiga Blitz Basic requires either an original Amiga computer with Kickstart and Workbench versions 3.0 or above, 12Mb Hard disk space, and an FPU, or an emulated Amiga (such as UAE or Amiga Forever) running on modern PC hardware. The latter is likely to be much faster and trouble free.

7 hours

$1,990

APE Users Guide

About

APE Users Guide is a course designed to help you get the most out of the open source 2D physics engine APE. APE (Actionscript Physics Engine) is written in AS3 and is designed for use in Flash or Flex games and applications. APE is a 2D physics engine written in Actionscript 3 for use in Flash and Flex. You can simulate 2D dynamics by using particles and connecting them with constraints to create more complex shapes. The engine currently has 3 different kinds of particle classes - the CircleParticle, RectangleParticle, and WheelParticle, and one type of constraint - the SpringConstraint.

7 hours

$1,990

Business Basic

About

Programming in Business Basic This is a place holder for the new Business Basic manual. Our goal is to create a replacement for Scott Bruce Ryan's out of date (1988) "What do you do after it says: READY>" for BBx/BBj, ProvideX and Thoroughbred. Business Basic is an interactive high-level programming language developed for minicomputer systems in the early 1970s. Derived from the original Dartmouth BASIC, Business Basic extended the language concepts by introducing file indexing methods which evolved into true keyed access technology similar to those methods available to COBOL programmers. Because of its interactive nature, Business Basic affords runtime event trapping capabilities, though the character-based systems did not permit the wide range of events that modern graphical environments do. Business Basic interpreters also offer extensive diagnostic capabilities, permitting developers to resolve live problems through telephone support without constantly having to ship updates. The interpretive nature of Business Basic also enhances development efforts through permitting quick testing and debugging of code. There are two primary "groups" or "families" of the Business Basic programming language: Other Business Basics have risen from the Point 4 systems running under IRIS.

7 hours

$1,990

Carbon Programming

About

Carbon is one of the application programming interfaces (APIs) for the Macintosh operating system, providing C programming language access to Macintosh system services. Carbon is one of four APIs that may be accessed from a Mac OS X program; the others are Cocoa, POSIX (including X Window), and Java. These APIs have some overlapping and some exclusive capabilities; as the functionality of Mac OS X changes they have not been kept in sync. Carbon provides a good degree of backward compatibility for programs to run on the now-obsolete Mac OS 8 and 9, but support for those systems has not been updated since 2001. "Carbon" has since become an umbrella term for C-language access to Macintosh-specific services, regardless of backward compatibility. The transition to 64-bit Macintosh applications beginning with Mac OS X v10.5 has brought the first major limitations to Carbon. Apple does not provide compatibility between the Macintosh graphical user interface and the C programming language in the 64-bit environment, instead requiring the use of the Objective-C dialect with the Cocoa API. Although Apple has always claimed that Objective-C is easy to learn, the required transition has slowed development of large Carbon-based applications such Adobe Photoshop.

7 hours

$1,990

Learn Component Based Development

About

This course is an introduction to component based development. Review of HTML, HTTP and networking fundamentals. Introduction to servlets, JSP and tag libraries. We introduce JPA and Hibernate. In this context two technologies are interesting, JSF and Apache Struts. Spring is a good example for dependency injection. Webservices, notably SOAP and REST have established themselves firmly. Here we may talk about JMS and EJB. Here we may talk about Grinder, Proxies and the Cloud. Don't leave home without it. How to test enterprise applications.

Content

  • Introduction
  • Basics
  • Serverside Programming
  • Object relational Mapping
  • Model View Controller
  • Dependency Injection
  • Webservices
  • Enterprise Topics
  • Scalability
  • Security
  • Software Tests
  • Template Engines
  • Modular Software
    • Additional Chapters

7 hours

$1,990

Harvard Chart Method

About

Harvard Chart Method of Logical Equation Reduction[1][2] was developed to address the need to automate the process of logical equation reduction in the early days of computer hardware and switching circuit development. Large scale production of computer circuitry entailed many more variables than could be reasonably handled by manual methods using Boolean logic, Venn diagrams, etc. Automated methods of logical equation reduction were necessary to minimize logic circuits and thereby reduce the number of logic gates which used vacuum tubes as switches due to their relatively high cost and excessive thermal emission. The Harvard Chart Method of logical equation reduction is capable of reducing binary logical equations having five or more variables to minimum form. As the number of variables increase, the number of operations required to minimize a logical equation increases exponentially, placing practical limits on performing logical equation reduction by hand. The Harvard Chart Method was developed to solve this problem by using a computerized method to automate the process of logical reduction. The method represents one of the first instances where computers were able to assist in the design of the circuits of which they are made. Application of this method is limited only by the logical speed and size of the computer (or computer network) on which it is run. A method based on the Harvard Chart Method has since been developed to reduce multi-valued logical equations to minimum form. (note this chart uses upper case to represent the logic state of "TRUE" and lower case to represent the logic state of "FALSE"

7 hours

$1,990

How to Write a Compiler

About

Many programmers see writing a compiler as the ultimate challenge. Unfortunately, most programmers also see writing a compiler as an extremely complex and daunting task. Writing a compiler doesn't need to be complicated, however. Before delving into the process of actually writing the compiler, a few key concepts must be learned. One of the keys to understanding how a compiler works is to understand the concept of abstraction. For example, when you get into a car and start the engine, you are actually performing a large number of smaller steps. You are using your muscles to maneuver your body into the vehicle. You are placing the key into the ignition. You are then turning the key until the car starts. In the same way, understanding a compiler requires us to step back and see the process as a series of larger tasks. We need to: Each of these steps is seen as a task, yet each consists of much smaller steps. Accepting an input file, for example, means checking for its existence, checking file permissions, and other related tasks. In the same way parsing the file requires breaking the contents into smaller and smaller units that we can then interpret according to the language's syntax.

7 hours

$1,990

How Wikipedia Works

About

How Wikipedia Works is a wiki remix of the 2008 book by Phoebe Ayers, Charles Matthews, and Ben Yates, with technical edits by Samuel Klein. It is a guide to understanding and using Wikipedia, for readers with a basic understanding of the project. It was published in the United States by No Starch Press under the GFDL, so that it would be compatible with Wikimedia projects, and in 2013 was relicensed under CC-BY-SA (see talk). We cover Wikipedia from soup to nuts: for readers trying to understand what’s in Wikipedia, how and why it got there, and how to analyze the quality of the content you might find on the site; for current and future editors, from basic editing techniques and wikisyntax to not-so-basic information on complicated syntax, referencing and researching content, and editing collaboratively and harmoniously; and finally for anyone interested in how Wikipedia’s vibrant and complicated community comes together to produce content, resolve disputes, and keep the site running. Finally, we touch on the wider world of Wikipedias in other languages, other Wikimedia projects, and the Wikimedia Foundation itself. We close with appendices about reusing Wikipedia content according to the terms of the GFDL license, and thoughts on using Wikipedia in a classroom setting. Throughout, we provide community consensus viewpoints and our own thoughts on a common-sense approach to using and participating in Wikipedia, and a selection of carefully-chosen links to the thousands of pages of documentation, help and Wikipedia-space pages that we discuss — not to mention a sprinkling of humor. In every discussion, we try to provide a sense of the community that supports and is at the heart of the Wikipedia project and mission.

7 hours

$1,990

Logo Programming

About

Logo inherits lists from Lisp, and they are its primary method of storing vectors. Arrays are also provided. One way would be to use iteration. Another, more elegant way would be This method uses recursion, and is an example of a functional rather than an imperative programming approach. And a more general way would be Logo provides several common control structures. There are iteration commands Recursion is Logo's preferred processing paradigm. Logo also provides list-based control structures. The basic idea is that you have two lists each of the commands is applied in turn to each of the data items. There are several of these template commands with names like MAP, APPLY, FILTER, FOREACH, REDUCE and CASCADE. They represent four flavours of template iteration, known as explicit-slot, named-procedure, named-slot (or Lambda), and procedure-text.

7 hours

$1,990

Learn Lua in SpringRTS

About

This course is going to help developers using Lua with the open-source SpringRTS game engine. This course covers mostly the integration of SpringRTS with Lua. This integration takes place in the form of widgets, gadgets, mods, maps. All these elements can be created with the use of Lua and the inbuilt functions and variables that the Spring Engine provides. It is assumed that the reader already has some basic knowledge of the Lua language. If you don't, then it is highly recommended that you first read the free Programming in Lua. A more fun way is by getting the source of widgets(which can be found here) and try to modify them and understand how they work. 

Content

  1. What is the Spring engine
  2. Lua integration with Spring
  3. Spring specifications
    • Synced Mode
    • Unsynced Mode
    • Gadgets
    • Widgets
  4. Games(mods)
    • Mod Structure
    • Units
      • 3D Models
      • Animations
      • Weapons
    • Features
    • Common identifiers
  5. Maps
  6. Spring API
    • Variables and Constants
    • Callins
    • Callouts

7 hours

$1,990

Programming with ooc

About

Welcome to the Programming with OOC. This is the first comprehensive effort to cover the entirety of the OOC language, among with a collection of idioms, in order to allow the general public to discover the language. ooc is a modern, self-hosting, object-oriented, functional-ish, high-level, low-level sexy programming language, starring closures, interfaces, enums, garbage collection.. It strives to be powerful, modular, extensible, portable, yet simple and fast. The main implementation OOC is rock, a self-hosting compiler which translates OOC sources to C source code, and then use a C compiler to produce an executable.

7 hours

$1,990

SQL/400

About

SQL/400 is a proprietary dialect of SQL for the IBM AS/400, which was later rebranded as iSeries and finally as SystemI, business eServer Computer Platform. It comes in several flavors, or ways that SQL can be run. All the AS/400 languages that support Static Embedded SQL also support Dynamic Embedded SQL. Static Embedded SQL statments are written into the source code of the high level language program, then an SQL Precompiler converts the SQL statements to a form that is acceptable to the high level language compiler. Dynamic SQL Statements are composed, prepared and run when the program is run. SQL statements can be placed within the calculations of an RPG program ... detail calculations, total calculations, or an RPG Subroutine. RPG identifies what section of a program, using a character in position 6 with a C for calculations. Here is how SQL statements are usually embedded in RPG program calculations. There can be any number of SQL Statements. Notice the slash at beginning of the first and last lines, that delineate the beginning and end of the SQL statements embedded in the RPG code. Notice the plus sign at the beginning of each SQL statement.

7 hours

$1,990

TI-Basic Programs

About

This course is a collection of TI-BASIC programs and their codes. By copying the code into your own TI-83+/TI-84 calculator, you will be able to use any of these programs on your own. There are just a few steps to follow in order to write a program onto your TI-83+ or TI-84 calculator using TI-BASIC.

  1. Turn on your calculator and press the PRGM button.
  2. Press the right arrow button twice to move to NEW.
  3. Press Enter to select Create New.
  4. Name the program. If the program is of your own creation, give it whatever name you would like it to have using the letters above each button or any of the numbers 0-9. If you are copying a program from this book, type in the name already given.
  5. Write the code of the program by using the digits and commands found on the calculator and by using the PRGM sub-menus while within the program code. These menus contain lists of many of the most vital programming commands, such as If, Then, End, While, Menu(, and many others. Other helpful menus of commands are the MATH, TEST, and DRAW command lists.

Note: Some of the programs in This course use lower-case letters in their program codes. In order for a TI calculator user to type in lower-case letters you must have MirageOS on your calculator. You must also check the checkbox for Enable Lowercase in Miscellaneous Options on the Options screen within MirageOS. The Options screen can be opened by pressing the ALPHA key in MirageOS. RAOSX is also useful for enabling lowercase letters and other common assembly functions. All of these can be used with the TI-83 and TI-84


7 hours

$1,990

Using the 3D Connexion SDK

About

For many people, developing software based on a specific piece of hardware can be a daunting task. This course is aimed at those with one year or less experience in programming. It is ideal to inspire those new to programming through practical exercises based on a real world example. The main language used in This course will be Visual Basic. Many experienced programmers will pick up the basics of the SDK quickly and soon begin making their own software. Please feel free to add a chapter on your program—the more the merrier. Some of the content of This course goes above the level of understanding required to effectively use Visual Basic. These paragraphs will be clearly identified using a different color Getting Started Chapter 1: An Introduction to Visual Basic

7 hours

$1,990

A First Course to Network Coding

About

Network coding is a rising paradigm for data transportation. It brings light to a prior dark area: that a node within a network can process information passing through it to make better use of the transmission capacity. This is a course aiming to introduce network coding to people with limited background in mathematics and/or engineering. The study of network coding interacts with various fields in engineering, mathematics, physics, even biology.[1] For readers to form a rigorous understanding of network coding, relevent knowledge in mathematics, information theory, engineering etc. is integrated in this course. This chapter gives the audience a general impression of a Shannon-Weaver communication model and a traditional network. This chapter aims to introduce the general idea of network coding via butterfly network, and demonstrate its superiority. This chapter introduces how to measure information, i.e. the concept of entropy and mutual information. This chapter focus on how to measure the performance of a network that implements coding.

7 hours

$1,990

Modern C++: The Good Parts

About

Many tutorials for C++ are targeted to C++ as it was standardized in 2003 (C++03) or earlier. Recent progress has produced C++11 and now C++14, and these newer versions have improved the level of simplicity and readability that is feasible for beginners. Many of these improvements supplant older features as the "best way" to solve problems. This course will present problems of increasing complexity, and not explain any given feature until it becomes appropriate for a problem. (See the talk page for a detailed discussion of this.) This course assumes the reader has access to an instructor (or savvy friend), and takes advantage of this for some of the assignments.

7 hours

$1,990


Is learning Programming XIII hard?


In the field of Programming XIII learning from a live instructor-led and hand-on training courses would make a big difference as compared with watching a video learning materials. Participants must maintain focus and interact with the trainer for questions and concerns. In Qwikcourse, trainers and participants uses DaDesktop , a cloud desktop environment designed for instructors and students who wish to carry out interactive, hands-on training from distant physical locations.


Is Programming XIII a good field?


For now, there are tremendous work opportunities for various IT fields. Most of the courses in Programming XIII is a great source of IT learning with hands-on training and experience which could be a great contribution to your portfolio.



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