Programming Language II Courses Online

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Programming Language II Training


Fundamentals of Wolfram Language

About

The Wolfram Language is a general multi-paradigm computational language developed by Wolfram Research. It emphasizes symbolic computation, functional programming, and rule-based programming and can employ arbitrary structures and data. It is the programming language of the mathematical symbolic computation program Mathematica.

Content

  • History

  • Syntax

    • Basics
    • Syntax sugar
    • Functional programming
    • Pattern matching
  • Implementations

 


7 hours

$1,990

Get to know Chipmunk Basic

About

Chipmunk Basic as supplied to freeware interpreter for Basic programming language called Chipmunk Basic (release 3 version 6 updates 6 patches 0) for Mac OS X (Snow Leopard) or newer by Ron H Nicholson. Some statements work only in the GUI-version, other via the command-line interface or both. Most commands and statements should work more or less the same under other supported platforms like Linux or Microsoft Windows. It's no obligation to start statements with a line number if you write them using an advanced syntax-checking editor like TextWrangler for OS X or Notepad++ on Windows. 

Content

Contents

  • Commands
  • Constants
  • Files
    • directory
    • file
    • input
    • print
    • serial-ports
  • Functions
  • Graphics
  • Objects
  • Operators
    • Arithmetic
    • Boolean algebra
    • Comparison
  • Sound
  • Statements
  • Subroutines
  • Downloads
    • Linux
    • Mac
    • Raspberry Pi
    • Windows

 


21 hours

$5,970

Discover Monkey Programming Language

About

Monkey is a BASIC dialect programming language that translates Monkey code into multiple cross-platforms. Currently, the supported target platforms include Windows, Mac OS X, Android, iOS, HTML5, Flash and XNA.

Monkey is the latest programming language by Blitz Research Limited, following BlitzMax (2004) and BlitzBasic (2000), two prior BASIC programming dialects from the same author.

Monkey code is translated into the target language via the Trans tool and into a native compiler depending on the target platform. Monkey requires the use of other compilers and development kits to reach the end target. This process is largely automated with the accompanying IDE, Monk (2011) and Ted (2012).

Content

  • History
  • Compilation
  • Modules
  • Code examples

14 hours

$3,980

Discover MUMPS Programming

About

MUMPS is a programming language. It is named after the acronym Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming Systems.

If you have programmed before and would like to see a little bit of how MUMPS works and is different from other programming languages, you can get an overview.

Content

  • Beginning MUMPS
  • MUMPS syntax and functions Lines, spaces, commands & arguments
  • Basic Terminology- Routines & Globals Programs: Routines, Database: Globals
  • MUMPS features
  • MUMPS and data
  • MUMPS code and interfaces
  • Setting up to Program MUMPS Set up the IDE and Install MUMPS
  • Advanced MUMPS
  • History of MUMPS

7 hours

$1,990

Learn PWCT (Programming Without Coding Technology)

About

PWCT is a general-purpose visual programming language and software development platform that enables the development of systems and applications, by generating interactive steps instead of writing code.

PWCT is Free and open-source software under the GNU General Public License version 2.

The visual source inside PWCT is designed using the Goal Designer where the programmer can generate the steps tree through the interaction with the visual language components.

Content

  • Concept
  • Features
  • Visual Languages

 

 

 


21 hours

$5,970

Get to know Vala Programming

About

Vala is a new programming language that aims to bring modern programming language features to GNOME developers without imposing any additional runtime requirements or different Application Binary Interfaces (ABIs) compared to applications and libraries written in C.

Content

  • History
  • Programming Style
  • Getting Started
  • Concepts
  • Syntax
  • Libraries
  • Techniques

21 hours

$5,970

A Little C Primer

About

This course is a quick introduction to the C programming language. It is written by a novice and is intended for use by a novice. However, it does assume familiarity with a programming language.

The C programming language is a "middle-level" language. It provides low-level programming capability at the expense of some user-friendliness. Cynics tend to claim that C combines the flexibility and power of assembly language with the user-friendliness of a high-level language, but experienced programmers find that the limited set of keywords and the use of pointers allows for fast and elegant programming solutions. C first rose to popularity with the growth of UNIX, and has been used creating the Windows operating system from its earliest versions. It is also used in microcontrollers and super-computers.

The original implementations of C were defined as described in the classic reference, THE C PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE, authored by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie. This definition left a few things to be desired, and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) formed a group in the 1980s to create a complete specification. The result was "ANSI C", which is the focus of this document.

Content

  • Tools For Programming
  • Table of Contents
    • Introduction to C; Functions; Control Constructs
    • C Variables, Operators & Preprocessor Directives
    • C Input & Output
    • C Library Functions & Other Comments
    • C Quick Reference
    • Comments and Revision History

21 hours

$5,970

Fundamentals of F# Programming

About

This course is suitable for complete beginners to F# and Functional Programming in general. F# is a functional programming language. Not surprisingly, functions are a big part of the language, and mastering them is the first step to becoming an effective F# developer. "Data structure" is a fancy word which refers to anything that helps programmers group and represent related values in useful, logical units. F# has a number of built-in data structures which include tuples, records, lists, unions, and a number of others. F# is an "impure" programming language, meaning it allows programmers to write functions with side-effects and mutable state, very similar to the programming style used by imperative programming languages such as C# and Java. F# is a CLI/.NET programming language. CLI is an object-oriented platform. One of the most important features of F# is its ability to mix and match styles: since the .NET platform is Object Oriented, with F#, you often work with objects. F# is easy enough for beginners to learn as their first language, yet it provides a powerful set of tools which can be appreciated by experienced developers. This section describes advanced syntactic contructs and techniques often used in F# programs.

Content

  • Introduction

  • Set-Up 

  • Basic Concepts 

  • Declaring Values and Functions

  • Pattern Matching Basics 

  • Recursion and Recursive Functions

  • Higher Order Functions 

  • Data Structures

    • Option Types

    • Tuples and Records 

    • Lists 

    • Sequences 

    • Sets and Maps 

    • Discriminated Unions 

  • Imperative Programming

    • Mutable Data 

    • Control Flow 

    • Arrays 

    • Mutable Collections

    • Basic I/O

    • Exception Handling

  • Object Oriented Programming

    • Operator Overloading

    • Classes 

    • Inheritance

    • Interfaces 

    • Events

    • Modules and Namespaces


21 hours

$5,970

Making a Programming Language From Scratch

About

This course covers the art of language creation. Making a language is a sophisticated task, however, simple languages can be made by transpiling to other higher level languages and by using lexing and parsing packages such as Bison or Flex. This course does not cover this. It demonstrates the creation of languages from nothing at all, as most commercial languages are. Here, the basic algorithms for conversion, assembly language equivalents for some common statements, the advantages and disadvantages of each type of compilation method, basic lexing and parsing are demonstrated. Note that This course assumes that you have at least a moderate understanding of x86 assembly and can write programs in a language. Keep in mind that language creation is an exhaustive process, and thus will require many days of hard labor to create.

Content

Preliminaries

  • Decisions

  • Line by Line Input System

Data Declarations

  • Simple Data Types

  • Arrays

  • Pointers

  • Structures

Expressions

  • Simple Expressions

  • Complex Expressions

Conditions

  • Comparing Two Values

  • Complex Conditions

  • The Braces Problem

  • If statements

  • Else if and else

  • While statements

Functions

  • Localizing

  • Function Definitions

  • Function Call


7 hours

$1,990

Learn Raku Programming

About

Raku is a successor of the Perl programming language, representing a major backwards-incompatible rewrite of the language. It's a versatile and powerful multi-paradigm programming language. This course is going to introduce the reader to the Raku language and its many features.

Content

  • Introduction

  • Raku Basics

    • Variables and Data
    • Types and Context
    • Basic Operations
    • Control Structures
    • Subroutines
    • Blocks and Closures
    • Classes And Attributes
    • Comments and POD
  • Rules and Grammars

    • Regular Expressions
    • Grammars
    • Operator Overloading
    • Language Extensions
  • Data Types and Operators

    • Junctions
    • Lazy Lists and Feeds
    • Meta Operators
    • Roles and Inheritance
  • Blocks and Subroutines

    • Advanced Subroutines
    • Exceptions and Handlers
    • Property Blocks
  • Multitasking and Concurrency

    • Coroutines
    • Threading
    • Save States
  • Input and Output

    • Files

 


21 hours

$5,970

Discover Alcor6L Programming

About

Alcor6L is a simple-to-use multi-language interactive programming environment that runs on a variety of embedded hardware devices.

It runs programs in:

  • Lua using eLua
  • C using PicoC
  • Lisp using PicoLisp

and in development:

  • BASIC using MY-BASIC
  • Scheme using TinyScheme
  • Forth (which?)

on cheap 32-bit single-board computers:

  • The Mizar32 models A and B by simplemachines.it, available from 4star.it
  • LM3S and STM32 ARM boards

 


7 hours

$1,990

ColdFusion Programming

About

ColdFusion is a JVM-based programming language that supports scripting and templating and was developed by J.J. Allaire in 1995 to make development of CGI scripts easier and faster. It has matured over the years to include many interfaces with other languages and environments. Timeline: n language. ColdFusion servers prior to version 6.0 were written in C++. Since version 6.0, the ColdFusion application server is a Java application sitting on top of the Java Platform. When a page is first called, the ColdFusion code is converted into Java bytecode; this allows better integration with the Java platform and also allows JSP "Java server pages" to be called and run from within a ColdFusion application. Beginning in version 7 there was a dramatic focus on RIA (Rich Internet Applications). The ability to include flash forms, xhtml forms, dynamically created pdfs and flashpaper were all included. Version 8, released in mid 2007, showed dramatic performance improvements, and extended the language functionality to include image processing, presentations, MS Exchange integration, support for .Net components, PDF Form manipulation, Ajax form components (based upon ExtJs 1.1), and more.

7 hours

$1,990

Erlang Programming

About

Erlang is a general purpose, concurrency-oriented functional programming language suited for fault-tolerant, distributed, soft real-time systems. It features strong dynamic typing, lightweight concurrency, eager evaluation and prolog like pattern matching. Erlang was developed in the 1980s at the Ericsson Computer Science Laboratory to address a then-unfulfilled need for telecommunications programming: a high-level, expressive language suitable for rapid development that offered the error recovery, concurrency, distribution and performance features required by telecommunications equipment. Although its roots are in telecommunications, Erlang's unique features and extensive library make it suitable as a general-purpose programming language and well-suited to programming projects such as network servers, control systems and web development. The Erlang language, together with an extensive library of applications and modules, a virtual machine and operating system, and a set of design principles establishing standard behaviors, comprise Erlang/OTP (OTP stands for Open Telecommunications Platform). Erlang/OTP is distributed as free software (under the Apache Public License) as well as a commercially supported version from Ericsson. Both distributions run on Microsoft Windows, VxWorks by Wind River, and many varieties of Unix.

7 hours

$1,990

Forth

About

The Forth language is a stack-based language designed for rapid interactive programming in limited-resource environments. Forth is interesting because it can be simple and small, yet it allows for remarkably powerful extensions to be written in Forth itself; most fully-fledged Forth systems are implemented partially in Forth. Forth is most often used to write embedded applications. Forth emphasizes a number of classic computer ideas, such as Many ritual necessities of other languages and required designer syntax falls away. Forth is an extensible language, giving the user great flexibility to extend it. This is both a pro and a con. As with modeling clay, in the hands of an architect with a clear philosophy it can work wonders, or it can create a hodgepodge. Much Forth programming consists of "adding words to a dictionary" and learning someone's program, the words they have chosen to create, and their significance is often confused with learning the language itself.

7 hours

$1,990

GLBasic Programming

About

The GLBasic Language is used in GLBasic, a program that makes programs with OpenGL and BASIC for very much operating systems BUT it's different programming than OpenGL and BASIC. So that you can learn how to program GLBasic in a very easy way! Here are all the things to learn about GLBasic: Warning! The next stuff is only for full version! If the pages are not ready made, it is to do!

7 hours

$1,990

Pascal Programming

About

Pascal is an influential computer programming language named after the mathematician Blaise Pascal. It was invented by Niklaus Wirth in 1968 as a research project into the nascent field of compiler theory.

Content

Standard Pascal

  • Getting started 
  • Beginning Pascal 
  • Variables and Constants 
  • Input and Output 
  • Expressions and Branches 
  • Routines 
  • Enumerations 
  • Sets
  • Arrays 
  • Strings
  • Records 
  • Pointers 
  • Files
  • Scopes

Extensions

  • Units 
  • Object-oriented Programming 
  • Exporting to libraries
  • Foreign Function Interfaces
    • Objective Pascal
  • Generics
  • Miscellaneous extensions

7 hours

$1,990

Prolog Fundamentals

About

Welcome to the Prolog Course. This course can serve as a course or tutorial for anyone who wants to learn the Prolog programming language. No prior programming experience is required. Some basic knowledge of logic can come in handy. For those new to the subject, a short introduction to logic is given, but this is not required reading. The first chapters of the course (under Basics) describe the central syntax and features of the language.

Content

  • Introduction
  • Rules
  • Recursive Rules
  • Variables
  • Lists
  • Math, Functions and Equality
  • Cuts and Negation
  • Reading and Writing code
  • Difference Lists
  • Definite Clause Grammars
  • Inference Engines
  • Testing Terms
  • Bagof, Setof and Findall
  • Modifying the Database
  • Input and Output

7 hours

$1,990

Application Development with Harbour

About

Cross platform application development is a challenging task. Many script languages are designed to run on interpreters that are available for many operating systems. The harbour-project has a different approach. It is capable of compiling native applications for many operating systems like MS-DOS, Windows (32 & 64), Windows CE, Pocket PC, OS/2, GNU/Linux and Mac OS X and you only write one source code. The Harbour Project is a Free Open Source Software effort to build a multiplatform Clipper language compiler. If you know nothing about harbour, you will get step-by-step instructions and many working code samples that help you get started so you can feel the power Right now, this is just a rough draft.

7 hours

$1,990

Asymptote

About

This is a user-maintained reference to the Asymptote markup language. It is intended that this can serve as a useful resource for everyone from new users who wish to learn, to old hands who need a quick reference. This section should contain recipes for different tasks. Please help to make the command pages: asy -l | grep '(' and add the functions to the command page along with info and examples. This is the default Asymptote base file, which defines key parts of the drawing language (such as the picture structure). By default, an implicit private import plain; occurs before translating a file and before the first command given in interactive mode. This also applies when translating files for module definitions (except when translating plain, of course). This means that the types and functions defined in plain are accessible in almost all Asymptote code. Use the -noautoplain command-line option to disable this feature. abort abs acos acosh add alias align all angle arc ArcArrow ArcArrows arcarrowsize arcdir arclength arcpoint arctime arrow Arrow arrow2 arrowhead arrowheadbbox Arrows arrowsize asin asinh ask atan atan2 atanh atexit attach AvantGarde axialshade azimuth bar Bar Bars barsize basealign baseline bbox BeginArcArrow BeginArrow BeginBar beginclip BeginDotMargin begingroup BeginMargin BeginPenMargin beginpoint Blank Bookman box cap cast cbrt cd ceil Ceil circle clear clip close cmyk colatitude colors complement concat conj controls copy cos cosh Courier cross csv cubiclength cubicroots curl cycle cyclic deconstruct defaultpen degrees Degrees dimension dir dirtime dot DotMargin DotMargins dotsize Dotted _draw draw Draw ecast ellipse empty EndArcArrow EndArrow EndBar endclip EndDotMargin endgroup endl EndMargin EndPenMargin endpoint eof eol erase erf erfc error _eval eval execute exitfunction exp expi fabs fft fill Fill filldraw fillrule filltype find finite firstcut floor Floor flush fmod font fontcommand fontsize format gamma getc getint getpair getreal getstring gouraudshade graphic gray grestore gsave gui GUI GUIop GUIreset Helvetica hypot identity image init initdefaults input insert inside interact interp intersect intersectionpoint inverse invisible italic J label Label labelmargin labels Landscape lastcut latitude latticeshade layer legend length line linecap linejoin lineskip linetype linewidth log log10 longitude Longitude makedraw makepen map margin Margin Margins marginT Mark marker marknodes markroutine markuniform math max maxbound maxcoords merge MidArcArrow MidArrow midpoint min minbound minipage NewCenturySchoolBook newpage nib NoFill NoMargin none None nullexitfcn orientation output overwrite Palatino pattern pause Pen PenMargin PenMargins point polar polygon Portrait postcontrol postscript pow10 precision precontrol prepend quadraticroots quiet quotient radialshade RadialShade rand read1 read2 read3 readGUI readline realmult rectify reflect relative Relative - specifies a relative location. relativedistance reldir relpoint reltime remainder replace resetdefaultpen restore restoredefaults reverse rfind rgb rotate round Round scale scroll search Seascape seek sequence sgn shift shiftless shipout sin single sinh size slant solve sort spec sqrt srand straight subpath substr suffix sum Symbol system tab tan tanh tell tension tex texify TeXify texpreamble time TimesRoman transpose tridiagonal trim TrueMargin unfill UnFill unit uptodate VERSION write xinput xoutput xpart xscale xtrans Y ypart yscale ytrans ZapfChancery ZapfDingbats zpart

7 hours

$1,990

ATS: Programming with Theorem-Proving

About

ATS is a programming language that unifies specification and implementation. It is equipped with a highly expressive type system rooted in the framework Applied Type System, which also gives the language its name. In ATS, a variety of programming paradigms are supported, including functional programming, imperative programming, (a restricted form of) object-oriented programming, modular programming, etc. In addition, ATS contains a theorem-proving component ATS/LF that allows proofs to be constructed as total functions. With this component, ATS advocates a programmer-centric approach to program verification that combines programming with theorem proving: How do we know that a program is correctly implemented? We ask the programmer implementing the program to also construct a proof attesting to that the program meets its specification. Furthermore, the theorem-proving component ATS/LF may be used as a logical framework for encoding various deduction systems and their (meta-)properties. What makes ATS distinctive is its emphasis on employing types and proofs to ensure program safety. For example, dereferencing null-pointers can be ruled out in ATS statically, i.e., at compile-time; out-of-bounds array subscripting can be ruled out statically; improper handling of memory such as leaking and double-freeing can be ruled out statically; etc. More importantly, ATS offers the programmer a great deal of flexibility in designing a type-based approach to capturing specific safety violations that he or she is interested in. This course is aimed to introduce you to the ATS programming language, from the basics to the most advanced features and is positioned be an alternative presentation of the official tutorial. We do not aim to teach you programming, for which you should consult other books (e.g. HtDP).

7 hours

$1,990

Beginning Java

About

The Java programming language is used widely in education and industry, and is a great choice as a first programming language. The aim of This course is to provide a starting point for readers not only new to Java but to programming in general in a progressive order with examples they can follow. If you want to edit or contribute, feel free to dig in and start editing, you are entirely encouraged to be bold. For those who don't know Java and wish to learn, or are simply interested in Java, feedback is requested and much appreciated. Table of Contents

7 hours

$1,990

Concurrent Clean

About

Concurrent Clean is a general-purpose purely functional programming language. This course is meant to be a companion Part I of Functional Programming in Clean. "Concurrent" refers to Clean's ability to run the same process on several computers, similar to Ada. The language is often just referred to as Clean. About Clean 1.1 The Language Reference Manual The language manual can be found at the Documentation page of the Clean website. Programming in Clean 2.1 Getting Started The Clean compiler can be found here [1]. Please register, as requested, though it is not necessary (you can click on "Download clean" on the left.) The .7z package is the quickest to download for Windows programming, if you have 7-zip. Then, get Part I of Functional Programming in Clean; get the 1-up PDF version if you plan to study from the computer.

7 hours

$1,990

D Programming

About

The goal for This course is to create a complete, free, open-content, well-organized online book for the D programming language. D is a programming language being designed as a successor to C++. Until this page gets better written and more informative, the D home can be found here. This course aims at beginners learning D language. It will cover all the language basics and some design aspects. In addition it will introduce topics like multi-threading, GUI programming and standard library to get you started with real-world applications. To quote Walter Bright, the author of the D Programming Language: D is a statically-typed, multi-paradigm language supporting imperative programming, object-oriented programming, and template metaprogramming. It also supports generics and design by contract. D has many features not seen in C++, implementing design by contract, unit testing, true modules, automatic memory management (garbage collection), first class arrays, associative arrays, dynamic arrays, array slicing, nested functions, inner classes, closures (anonymous functions), and has a reengineered template syntax. D retains C++'s ability to do low-level coding, and adds to it with support for an integrated inline assembler. C++ multiple inheritance is replaced by single inheritance with interfaces and mixins. D's declaration, statement and expression syntax closely matches that of C++.

7 hours

$1,990

FPI Script

About

The FPI scripting language is a simple trigger-based artificial intelligence language used to program objects in games. It consist of a simple if/then syntax and a pre-defined list of conditional statements and commands. The statements start with a colon. Following that is a condition, a test to see if something is true. If there is more than one condition, they are separated by a comma. After all the conditions have been listed, there is another colon. The second colon separates the conditions from the actions. If you are familiar with other programming languages, this is similar to an IF THEN conditional statement. if(CONDITION) { ACTION } Translates to: There is also comments to help you organize a script, comments start with a semicolon e.g. FPI script can be used for a number of operations including object behaviour and Artificial intelligence scripts. A more detailed description of each clause and examples can be found in FPI Usage Examples

7 hours

$1,990

Icon Programming

About

Icon is a modern high-level programming language. It provides many useful features for managing data, generators and much more. It is not object-oriented, but the UN-icon variant, UNICON, is object-oriented as is ObjectIcon (code.google.com/p/objecticon) Here is a tiny but complete Icon program. As you see, the code is very simple. Lines procedure main() and end enclose the body of the program. The second line is responsible for printing Hello world! on your standard output (usually screen). Naturally, procedure write prints the string which is given as a parameter. There is a similar procedure read which reads a line from standard input (usually keyboard). Save the program from the previous section to file helloworld.icn. Type in linux shell. The executable file named helloworld will be generated. You can run it now. The program consists of procedures. Every procedure begins with procedure reserved word followed by the name of the procedure and list of arguments (it can be empty). The procedure ends with end. All the instructions are separated by newline or semicolon.

7 hours

$1,990

Introducing Julia

About

The Julia programming language is easy to use, fast, and powerful. This course is intended as an introduction to the language for the less experienced and occasional programmer. For more learning materials, including links to books, videos, articles/blogs and notebooks, refer to the learning section at Julia's official site. The official Julia documentation is excellent, and you should refer to it as often as possible. The Julia community has established a good ethos of encouraging participation in the development of the language on github. The advantage of This course is that it's made and edited by the Julia community – you can edit anything at any time. If you find something that's wrong, or unclear, feel free to correct it, or add examples. (Your first few edits are reviewed, just in case you have less than good intentions. And, as with the Wikipedia, you should expect your writing to be edited by others!) The focus should be largely on the new user, rather than the computer science expert.

7 hours

$1,990

Introduction to BASIC

About

BASIC was originally implemented as a combined computer language and command interpreter invented in 1964 at Dartmouth College by J. Kemeny and T. Kurtz. it was an important part of a project to make timeshared computer access available to a large community, in this case Dartmouth College. It was first implemented on a GE 225 computer. BASIC combines both programming and computer control into a single interface. The language is a simple set of variable assignments, control flow and data handling. It was designed to be easier for most users than Fortran, but the Dartmouth version, surprisingly, included matrix operations which have not been part of most other implementations. The computer control allows the user to perform simple commands such as file save & load and program start and stop. Because BASIC can be interpreted, and because more or less useful variants can be implemented with a small interpreter, it was an attractive choice as a high-level language for the earliest microcomputers. BASIC interpreters were generally supplied burned into ROMs which were limited (in affordable sizes) to 2KB or 4KB. Apple supplied its IntegerBASIC in ROM with the Apple II; Microsoft began as a specialist in providing ROMed BASICs to assorted computer vendors, including Atari, Altair (the original Microsoft product!), Commodore (PET / VIC-20 / 64), Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 1, 2, etc and the Color Computer), and even, rather later on, IBM in its earliest PC models (ie, BASICA). Because the amount of RAM available on many of these early machines was severely limited, most of the ROMed BASICS had an extremely limited and abbreviated syntax to permit more than toy programs to fit into the installed RAM. Inevitably, this produced an opaque and obscure programming style. For instance, in most Microsoft BASICs, commented lines could begin with a single "'" character, rather than the original "REM", most commands could be abbreviated to the first letter ("L" for "LET"), variable names could be similarly contracted, and so on.

7 hours

$1,990

Irony - Language Implementation Kit

About

Irony is a development kit for implementing languages on the .NET platform. It uses the flexibility and power of the C# language and .NET Framework 3.5 to implement a completely new and streamlined technology of compiler construction. Unlike most existing yacc/lex-style solutions, Irony does not employ any scanner or parser code generation from grammar specifications written in a specialized meta-language. In Irony, the target language grammar is coded directly in C# using operator overloading to express grammar constructs. Irony's scanner and parser modules use the grammar encoded as a C# class to control the parsing process. The Irony project is hosted on CodePlex. Do not fill out yet as code base is subject to major changes in this area!

7 hours

$1,990

Learning D With Project Euler

About

D is a systems programming language. Its focus is on combining the power and high performance of C and C++ with the programmer productivity of modern languages like Ruby and Python. Special attention is given to the needs of quality assurance, documentation, management, portability and reliability.[1] Project Euler is a website dedicated to a series of math problems intended to be solved with computer programs. Each problem has been designed according to a "one-minute rule", which means that an efficient implementation will allow a solution to be obtained on a modestly powered computer in less than one minute.[2] In this article, I pick some problems and show you how to solve them with D. First, we need a D compiler. All the examples below use dmd 2.0.32, you can download it from the official website. Extract the compiler from the zip file and try compiling the "Hello World" program: If you are using Windows, simply run something like this:

7 hours

$1,990

Linoleum

About

L.In.O.L.E.U.M. (also called Linoleum or Lino) is a programming language developed by Alessandro Ghignola. It is an assembler, easier than native assembly, and twice as fast as C/C++. Uniquely it is designed to be recompilable across CPUs. Compilers are free. Versions exist for Linux and Windows, although the Linux port is currently incomplete (most features are working). Currently, compilable files use the extension ".txt". After installing, in Windows, right-clicking on a txt file gives the option to read into notepad (as usual) or compile into a Linoleum executable file ".exe". Code is cleaner and simpler than C, with comments appearing in parentheses (like so), which seems rather obvious and then someone does it. Code from MyLinoClock4.0:A tutorial to introduce Linoleum to people new to programming has been written by the user known on the anynowhere.com community as Ponche. It is available there, along with French and Italian translations and an editable version, in the "l.in.oleum" section under "Advice For Newbies".

7 hours

$1,990

REALbasic

About

Welcome to the REALbasic community maintained manual for beginning and intermediate users of the REALbasic computer programming language. This project is not an effort to recreate existing REALbasic documentation. Instead, our goal is create materials that can be used to teach programming skills using REALbasic. We want contributors to assume the readers of these pages are new not only to REALbasic, but to programming in general. Our goal is a complete beginners' guide to programming, not a guide to advanced techniques in REALbasic. Teachers and students are our primary audience. A secondary audience would be those individuals wanting to learn programming independently using REALbasic. To contribute to this project, please adhere to the standard book structure. We will also develop a Style Guide for this specific manual. It is key that all conventions be followed to ensure the print output generation functions properly.

7 hours

$1,990

TeX

About

TeX is a language used to typeset documents, especially ones containing mathematics. It has both programming and mark-up features. In This course we will describe "primitive TeX"—the basic engine for the macro languages plain TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and so on. If you are new to TeX, then this is probably not what you want to read: you may be looking for LaTeX, a macro package for TeX that makes it easier to produce standard documents. TeX is Donald Knuth's macro language, written to typeset documents. TeX can in principle be used for any kind of program (it is a Turing complete programming language). The canonical source for learning the TeX language, both to write documents and to program, is the TeXbook by Donald Knuth. There's also a comprehensive programmer's reference called TeX by topic which the author has generously made available free at his website as well as TeX for the Impatient. We describe the basic anatomy of TeX: the registers, the parameters, and other resource that affect the processing of a TeX source file.

7 hours

$1,990

Elm programming language

About

Elm is a functional programming language for declaratively creating web browser based graphical user interfaces. Elm uses the Functional Reactive Programming style and purely functional graphical layout to build user interface without any destructive updates. The primary implementation of Elm compiles to JavaScript and HTML, with the use of CSS styles. In Elm, Functional Reactive Programming takes the place of event handlers and callbacks; it also manages all screen updates automatically. Purely functional graphical layout takes the place of working with the DOM. Elm also allows Markdown to be embedded directly. Elm adopts a Haskell styled syntax, with influences from OCaml and FSharp. For example, "has type" is written with a single colon (:), and forward and backward function application use the (<|) and (|>) operators[1] where (f x) equals (f <| x) equals (x |> f). Elm has extensible records[2] which safely provide much of the flexibility of Javascript's object model. The type system supports primitive types like integers and floats, structured data like tuples and records, and custom ADT's.[3]

7 hours

$1,990

Ring

About

The Ring is an Innovative and practical general-purpose multi-paradigm scripting language that can be embedded in C/C++ projects, extended using C/C++ code and/or used as standalone language. The supported programming paradigms are Imperative, Procedural, Object-Oriented, Functional, Meta programming, Declarative programming using nested structures, and Natural programming. The language is portable (Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, Android, etc.) and can be used to create Console, GUI, Web, Games and Mobile applications. The language is designed to be Simple, Small, Flexible and Fast. Its Dynamic Language (Dynamic Typing and Weakly Typed) that compile the source code to byte code then execute it by the Ring Virtual Machine, which is integrated with the Ring Compiler in one program. The first version of the language (around 100,000 lines of C/C++/Ring code) is released on January 25th, 2016

7 hours

$1,990


Is learning Programming Language II hard?


In the field of Programming Language II learning from a live instructor-led and hand-on training courses would make a big difference as compared with watching a video learning materials. Participants must maintain focus and interact with the trainer for questions and concerns. In Qwikcourse, trainers and participants uses DaDesktop , a cloud desktop environment designed for instructors and students who wish to carry out interactive, hands-on training from distant physical locations.


Is Programming Language II a good field?


For now, there are tremendous work opportunities for various IT fields. Most of the courses in Programming Language II is a great source of IT learning with hands-on training and experience which could be a great contribution to your portfolio.



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